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  1. Newbie
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    #1

    Dog My Cats - origins

    Hello everyone!

    I am doing an assignment in American Literature and encountered the idiom "Dog my Cats!"

    My questions is - Does the idiom belong to a certain type of slang?
    For example, in "The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn" it is used by Jim, the escaped slave.
    Is it a part of the African American Vernacular English (AAVE)?


    Thank you!

  2. VIP Member
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    #2

    Re: Dog My Cats - origins

    I've never heard it, but I found this: https://idioms.thefreedictionary.com/dog+my+cats

    Welcome to the forum.
    Typoman - writer of rongs

  3. Editor, UsingEnglish.com
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    #3

    Re: Dog My Cats - origins

    Quote Originally Posted by Ryves View Post
    Is it a part of the African American Vernacular English (AAVE)?
    I have never heard it in British English.

  4. Moderator
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    #4

    Re: Dog My Cats - origins

    Quote Originally Posted by Ryves View Post
    Is it a part of the African American Vernacular English (AAVE)?
    You might hear it occasionally in my region from an older white person with Appalachian roots. If it was ever part of AAVE, it was a very long time ago.
    I am not a teacher.

  5. Tarheel's Avatar
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    #5

    Re: Dog My Cats - origins

    Quote Originally Posted by Ryves View Post
    Hello everyone!

    I am doing an assignment on American Literature and encountered the idiom "Dog my cats!"

    My questions is - Does the idiom belong to a certain type of slang?
    For example, in "The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn" it is used by Jim, the escaped slave.
    Is it a part of the African American Vernacular English (AAVE)?

    That expression was known in the days of Mark Twain. (I had to google it.) It's considered a mild oath. I don't think it's used much these days.
    Not a professional teacher

  6. probus's Avatar
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    #6

    Re: Dog My Cats - origins

    Also unheard of here in Canada.
    Last edited by probus; 02-Dec-2020 at 17:13. Reason: Typo

  7. Charlie Bernstein's Avatar
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    #7

    Re: Dog My Cats - origins

    Quote Originally Posted by Ryves View Post
    Hello everyone!

    I am doing an assignment in American Literature and encountered the idiom "Dog my cats!"

    My questions are: Does the idiom belong to a certain type of slang?

    Maybe.


    For example, in "The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn" it is used by Jim, the escaped slave.

    Is it a part of the African American Vernacular English (AAVE)?

    Maybe.


    Thank you!
    My dad used to say it all the time when he wanted to sound folksy with "Well" in front of it.
    I'm not a teacher. I speak American English. I've tutored writing at the University of Southern Maine and have done a good deal of copy editing and writing, occasionally for publication.

  8. teechar's Avatar
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    #8

    Re: Dog My Cats - origins

    I like "Shiver me timbers".

  9. probus's Avatar
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    #9

    Re: Dog My Cats - origins

    Quote Originally Posted by teechar View Post
    I like "Shiver me timbers".
    AAAAAARRRR!

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