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Thread: as light as

  1. #1
    alpacinoutd is offline Key Member
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    as light as

    Hello.

    Imagine someone does a lot of exercise and they don't have body fat and they are light.

    Now, you want to give them a compliment. Can you say "as light as a bird"? Or as light as a feather?

    Do these work?

    1. Emily works out every day. She is as light as a bird.

    2. Emily works out every day. She is as light as a feather.


    Is there another idiom or more interesting way of expressing that idea?

  2. #2
    emsr2d2's Avatar
    emsr2d2 is offline Moderator
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    Re: as light as

    Of the two, only "light as a feather" works. There are some really heavy birds!

    However, it's not a very natural way of describing someone's weight (not something we do very often anyway). I find it particularly odd when connected to the idea that she works out. Generally, working out develops your muscles which, counter-intuitively, can actually weigh more than fat, so it's not necessarily true that someone who works out every day is going to weigh less than someone who doesn't.

    I'd say something like "There's not an ounce of fat on her".
    Remember - if you don't use correct capitalisation, punctuation and spacing, anything you write will be incorrect.

  3. #3
    alpacinoutd is offline Key Member
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    Re: as light as

    Quote Originally Posted by emsr2d2 View Post
    Of the two, only "light as a feather" works. There are some really heavy birds!

    However, it's not a very natural way of describing someone's weight (not something we do very often anyway). I find it particularly odd when connected to the idea that she works out. Generally, working out develops your muscles which, counter-intuitively, can actually weigh more than fat, so it's not necessarily true that someone who works out every day is going to weigh less than someone who doesn't.

    I'd say something like "There's not an ounce of fat on her".
    Regardless of the working out part, is there an idiom which can be used to highlight the fact that she is "light"?

  4. #4
    emsr2d2's Avatar
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    Re: as light as

    As a standalone sentence, "She is/She looks as light as a feather" is OK. You might hear "She looks like she'd be blown over by a strong breeze" in BrE. If referring to her build rather than her actual weight, you can use "She's as thin/skinny as a rake" in BrE.
    Remember - if you don't use correct capitalisation, punctuation and spacing, anything you write will be incorrect.

  5. #5
    Tarheel's Avatar
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    Re: as light as

    "As thin as a rail" in American English.
    Not a professional teacher

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