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    #1

    Break a habit/Get rid of a habit/ Remove a habit.

    When talking about habits which ones are more natural/colloquial?

    - Break a habit/Get rid of a habit/ Remove a habit.
    - Form a habit/ Develop a habit/ Start a habit.

  2. emsr2d2's Avatar
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    #2

    Re: Break a habit/Get rid of a habit/ Remove a habit.

    Quote Originally Posted by Ashraful Haque View Post
    When talking about habits, which ones are more natural/colloquial?

    - Break a habit/Get rid of a habit/Remove a habit.
    - Form a habit/Develop a habit/Start a habit.
    See above. Green = use. Red = don't use.

    I almost marked "Start a habit" as possible but I changed my mind. You can start doing something, hoping that it might become a habit but that's not the same thing. For example, you can say "I'm trying to get into the habit of getting up at 6am to do some yoga before breakfast".

    Remember that we don't put a space before or after a forward slash.
    Remember - if you don't use correct capitalisation, punctuation and spacing, anything you write will be incorrect.

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    #3

    Re: Break a habit/Get rid of a habit/ Remove a habit.

    Quote Originally Posted by emsr2d2 View Post
    See above. Green = use. Red = don't use.

    I almost marked "Start a habit" as possible but I changed my mind. You can start doing something, hoping that it might become a habit but that's not the same thing. For example, you can say "I'm trying to get into the habit of getting up at 6am to do some yoga before breakfast".

    Remember that we don't put a space before or after a forward slash.
    An IELTS question says "Why do you think it's so hard for people to change bad habits?"
    I know this kind of book/lesson isn't always meant for teaching natural English. Is 'change a habit' natural?

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    #4

    Re: Break a habit/Get rid of a habit/ Remove a habit.

    I have another question. While answering the question about bad habits I said:
    "Bad habits develop over time."
    I wonder if I should've "We develop bad habits over time."

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    #5

    Re: Break a habit/Get rid of a habit/ Remove a habit.

    Quote Originally Posted by Ashraful Haque View Post
    An IELTS question says "Why do you think it's so hard for people to change bad habits?"
    I know this kind of book/lesson isn't always meant for teaching natural English. Is 'change a habit' natural?
    Yes.
    I am not a teacher.

  6. Phaedrus's Avatar
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    #6

    Re: Break a habit/Get rid of a habit/ Remove a habit.

    Quote Originally Posted by Ashraful Haque View Post
    When talking about habits which ones are more natural/colloquial?

    - Break a habit/Get rid of a habit/ Remove a habit.
    You can also speak, idiomatically, of kicking a habit.

    He started smoking a year ago and can't kick the habit.

  7. Member
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    #7

    Re: Break a habit/Get rid of a habit/ Remove a habit.

    *Not a teacher*

    We can also say, "Give up" this bad habit.

  8. Charlie Bernstein's Avatar
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    #8

    Re: Break a habit/Get rid of a habit/ Remove a habit.

    Quote Originally Posted by Ashraful Haque View Post
    I have another question. While answering the question about bad habits I said:
    "Bad habits develop over time."
    I wonder if I should've "We develop bad habits over time."
    Either way is fine. They're both natural, and they mean the same thing.
    I'm not a teacher. I speak American English. I've tutored writing at the University of Southern Maine and have done a good deal of copy editing and writing, occasionally for publication.

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    #9

    Re: Break a habit/Get rid of a habit/ Remove a habit.

    If you stop doing something you break that. Saying you want to change that habit seems to mean you want to substitute a different habit for it.
    Last edited by emsr2d2; 30-Oct-2020 at 08:23. Reason: Fixed typo
    Not a professional teacher

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