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  1. Senior Member
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    #11

    Re: This old car vs this quite an old car

    Quote Originally Posted by GoesStation View Post
    No. The construction doesn't exist.
    Thank you. What if I change it to 'This, quite a new, car is more expensive than many others'?
    Not a teacher or native speaker

  2. Moderator
    Retired English Teacher
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    #12

    Re: This old car vs this quite an old car

    No. Forget that, too.

  3. jutfrank's Avatar
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    #13

    Re: This old car vs this quite an old car

    You're confusing two different patterns.

    1) It is quite an old car.
    2) This quite old car is mine.

    3) This quite an old car is mine.
    Last edited by jutfrank; 31-Oct-2020 at 02:11.

  4. teechar's Avatar
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    #14

    Re: This old car vs this quite an old car

    Quote Originally Posted by jutfrank View Post
    2) This quite old car is mine.
    I agree that the above structure exists.
    This quite frightened man was found wandering around the town square.

    However, it may be in decline (for whatever reason) and may not be natural in all varieties of English.

  5. Tarheel's Avatar
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    #15

    Re: This old car vs this quite an old car

    Well, I wouldn't use very old car.

    A car that's very old is one of two things. It's either an antique or it's junk.

    I find quite old (used with cars) to be rather unnatural. (Maybe it's just me.)
    Not a professional teacher

  6. Phaedrus's Avatar
    Senior Member
    English Teacher
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    #16

    Re: This old car vs this quite an old car

    Quote Originally Posted by teechar View Post
    I agree that the above structure exists.
    This quite frightened man was found wandering around the town square.

    However, it may be in decline (for whatever reason) and may not be natural in all varieties of English.
    I seem to find it more natural when there is more than one attributive adjective, quite coming between the determiner and the first attributive adjective:

    This quite frightened old man was found wandering around the town square.
    He bought this quite clunky old car.
    He encountered this quite spirited young woman who was handing out fliers.

    Where there is a string of adjectives, the further removed from the head noun an adjective is, the more commentary-like that adjective tends to be. Compare:

    This old man who was quite frightened was found wandering around the town square.
    He bought this old car that was quite clunky.
    He encountered this young woman handing out fliers
    who was quite spirited.

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