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    • Join Date: May 2006
    • Posts: 1,335
    #1

    An unfair question?

    Hi,
    Im looking for an adjective to modify such words as question, comparison when they contain some logic(al?) fallacy, for example one is supposed to give only 1 answer:
    1. Which is better a) tea b) coffee
    2. Find the verb (not verbs) in the sentence: I should have known better.
    Sometimes this kind of questions - referring to any sphere- are deliberately used as a demagogical trick in some debates in order to entice the adversary into a wrong path and disorientate them.
    Could it be an ill-posed question/ comparison?
    Tnx


  1. #2

    Re: An unfair question?

    deceitful?
    delusive?
    fallacious?
    misleading?
    divertive?

    Probably I would go for misleading...

  2. rewboss's Avatar

    • Join Date: Feb 2006
    • Posts: 1,552
    #3

    Re: An unfair question?

    A trick question?


    • Join Date: May 2006
    • Posts: 1,335
    #4

    Re: An unfair question?

    Tnx, Mariner,
    I think there's probably only one which forms a set collocation with question or comparison. In Russian it sounds like an incorrect question/comparison, but I'm afraid of calques.
    Cheers


    • Join Date: May 2006
    • Posts: 1,335
    #5

    Re: An unfair question?

    Hi,
    Anybody else, please?
    Tnx

  3. Philly's Avatar

    • Join Date: Jun 2006
    • Posts: 620
    #6

    Re: An unfair question?

    .
    I think the suggestion from Rewboss (trick question) sounds good.
    .
    You could also say a loaded question. This expression can be used when there's some kind of explosive, hidden agenda or emotionally charged issue involved, so it doesn't really fit your examples very well.
    .
    Both are common collocations, however.
    Last edited by Philly; 26-Oct-2006 at 08:16.

  4. BobK's Avatar
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    • Join Date: Jul 2006
    • Posts: 16,038
    #7

    Re: An unfair question?

    There's also a leading question. This was originally applied to a question that led a witness in a court case to suggest something that the barrister [lawyer/counsel/advocate - depending on where you come from] wanted them to say, but it is quite frequently used now to refer to a question that invites an incriminating answer: "When did you stop beating your wife?"

    b


    • Join Date: May 2006
    • Posts: 1,335
    #8

    Re: An unfair question?

    Thanks, Philly and Bob,
    I do appreciate these pieces of info, still the elusive word escapes. Irrelevant? No. I know it's often used in scientific or other debates. I will think of other contexts to let you get what I mean.

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