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  1. #1
    Rachel Adams is offline Key Member
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    "There is a computer and a TV."

    Isn't it wrong to use "is" if I have two nouns? I wanted to start with "are" but there is an indefinite article and a singular word so I wasn't sure.


    "There is a computer and a TV in my room."

    From "English File" by Christina Koenig.

  2. #2
    emsr2d2's Avatar
    emsr2d2 is offline Moderator
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    Re: "There is a computer and a TV."

    Native speakers tend to go with "There's" at the start of such a sentence. We use "There are" before a plural noun, more than one plural noun, or a plural noun followed by singular nouns.

    There's a computer and a table in my room.
    There are two computers in my room.
    There are two computers and three tables in my room.
    There are two computers, a table and a desk in my room.

    "There is" sounds unnatural to me in the first. That's probably why we contract it to "There's" which, in BrE at least, can serve as "There is" and "There are".
    Remember - if you don't use correct capitalisation, punctuation and spacing, anything you write will be incorrect.

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    PaulMatthews is offline Member
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    Re: "There is a computer and a TV."

    Quote Originally Posted by Rachel Adams View Post
    Isn't it wrong to use "is" if I have two nouns? I wanted to start with "are" but there is an indefinite article and a singular word so I wasn't sure.

    "There is a computer and a TV in my room." From "English File" by Christina Koenig.
    What does your book say?

  4. #4
    PeterCW is offline Member
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    Re: "There is a computer and a TV."

    Quote Originally Posted by emsr2d2 View Post
    Native speakers tend to go with "There's" at the start of such a sentence. We use "There are" before a plural noun, more than one plural noun, or a plural noun followed by singular nouns.

    There's a computer and a table in my room.
    There are two computers in my room.
    There are two computers and three tables in my room.
    There are two computers, a table and a desk in my room.

    "There is" sounds unnatural to me in the first. That's probably why we contract it to "There's" which, in BrE at least, can serve as "There is" and "There are".

    I would probably use "There's" when speaking in all those example but in written English I would use "There is" or "There are" as appropriate. I would never use "There's" in writing except as reported speech.
    Retired magazine editor and native British English speaker - not a teacher

  5. #5
    Rachel Adams is offline Key Member
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    Re: "There is a computer and a TV."

    Quote Originally Posted by PaulMatthews View Post
    What does your book say?
    It doesn't have answers. I mean answer key.

  6. #6
    Rachel Adams is offline Key Member
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    Re: "There is a computer and a TV."

    Quote Originally Posted by emsr2d2 View Post
    Native speakers tend to go with "There's" at the start of such a sentence. We use "There are" before a plural noun, more than one plural noun, or a plural noun followed by singular nouns.

    There's a computer and a table in my room.
    There are two computers in my room.
    There are two computers and three tables in my room.
    There are two computers, a table and a desk in my room.

    "There is" sounds unnatural to me in the first. That's probably why we contract it to "There's" which, in BrE at least, can serve as "There is" and "There are".
    Sorry, but I didn't understand your last sentence. You said "There's" can serve as "There is" and "There are." Do you mean in the first sentence "There is" serves as "There are"?

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    Piscean is offline VIP Member
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    Re: "There is a computer and a TV."

    Quote Originally Posted by Rachel Adams View Post
    You said "There's" can serve as "There is" and "There are." Do you mean in the first sentence "There is" serves as "There are"?
    The first sentence has There's, not There are.
    Typoman - writer of rongs

  8. #8
    GoesStation is online now Moderator
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    Re: "There is a computer and a TV."

    Quote Originally Posted by Rachel Adams View Post
    Do you mean in the first sentence "There is" serves as "There are"?
    Yes — but only "there's" is natural.
    Last edited by GoesStation; 23-Nov-2020 at 17:06. Reason: Expand explanation.
    I am not a teacher.

  9. #9
    Piscean is offline VIP Member
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    Re: "There is a computer and a TV."

    It's There's, not There is that can function as There are.
    Typoman - writer of rongs

  10. #10
    Rachel Adams is offline Key Member
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    Re: "There is a computer and a TV."

    Quote Originally Posted by Piscean View Post
    It's There's, not There is that can function as There are.
    Oh, interesting. It's not even mentioned in the book. That's why it's not wrong to use it when we have two or more nouns. Because usually it is "There is an apple on the table" but "There are two apples on the table." But as it functions as "there are" I can also say "There's two apples on the table."

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