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  1. #1
    Son Ho is offline Member
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    Smile The porter just stood there, expecting a tip.

    Good afternoon, teachers!
    Could you please tell me the second or third sentence is correct? Does it explains the action stood there?


    1. The porter just stood there. He expected a tip.
    2. The porter just stood there, expecting a tip.
    3. Expecting a tip, the porter just stood there.

  2. #2
    teechar's Avatar
    teechar is offline Moderator
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    Re: The porter just stood there, expecting a tip.

    Quote Originally Posted by Son Ho View Post
    Could you please tell me if the second or third sentence is correct?
    Yes, they are both correct.

    Quote Originally Posted by Son Ho View Post
    Does it explains the action stood there?

    That's ungrammatical, and I'm not sure what you mean by it.

  3. #3
    tedmc is online now VIP Member
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    Re: The porter just stood there, expecting a tip.

    I think #2 is the most natural of the three.
    I am not a teacher or a native speaker.

  4. #4
    Son Ho is offline Member
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    Re: The porter just stood there, expecting a tip.

    Quote Originally Posted by teechar View Post
    Yes, they are both correct.


    That's ungrammatical, and I'm not sure what you mean by it.
    It means the phrase expecting a tip. Does the first sentence have the same meaning with the second and third?


    1. The porter just stood there because he expected a tip.
    2. Expecting a tip, the porter just stood there.
    3. The porter just stood there, expecting a tip.

  5. #5
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    Re: The porter just stood there, expecting a tip.

    Quote Originally Posted by Son Ho View Post
    It means I meant the phrase expecting a tip. Does the first sentence have the same meaning with as the second and third?


    1. The porter just stood there because he expected a tip.
    2. Expecting a tip, the porter just stood there.
    3. The porter just stood there, expecting a tip.


    Not exactly, no. Sentences 2 and 3 mean the same as each other. Sentence 1 adds the information that the only reason he was standing there was that he was expecting a tip. The use of "because" definitely changes the tone of the sentence. 2 and 3 express that he was doing two things - standing there and expecting a tip. I accept that, logically, the reader would assume that he was standing there for exactly the purpose of receiving a tip but that's unequivocally expressed only in sentence 1.
    Remember - if you don't use correct capitalisation, punctuation and spacing, anything you write will be incorrect.

  6. #6
    PaulMatthews is offline Member
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    Re: The porter just stood there, expecting a tip.

    Quote Originally Posted by Son Ho View Post
    Good afternoon, teachers!
    Could you please tell me the second or third sentence is correct? Does it explains the action stood there?

    1.The porter just stood there. He expected a tip.
    2. The porter just stood there, expecting a tip.
    3. Expecting a tip, the porter just stood there.
    [2] The porter just stood there, expecting a tip.
    [3] Expecting a tip, the porter just stood there.

    These are both fine; there's little to choose between them.

    The underlined non-finite clause is best analysed as a depictive adjunct, giving descriptive information about the porter.

    Note that it is interpreted with progressive aspectuality: "the porter was expecting a tip".

  7. #7
    Son Ho is offline Member
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    Re: The porter just stood there, expecting a tip.

    Quote Originally Posted by emsr2d2 View Post
    Not exactly, no. Sentences 2 and 3 mean the same as each other. Sentence 1 adds the information that the only reason he was standing there was that he was expecting a tip. The use of "because" definitely changes the tone of the sentence. 2 and 3 express that he was doing two things - standing there and expecting a tip. I accept that, logically, the reader would assume that he was standing there for exactly the purpose of receiving a tip but that's unequivocally expressed only in sentence 1.
    Could I express one of two actions by a present participle when they occur simultaneously? Are they exactly the same?


    1. The porter just stood there, expecting a tip.
    2. Standing there, the porter expected a tip.
    Last edited by GoesStation; 24-Jan-2021 at 13:54. Reason: Remove a stray tag.

  8. #8
    PaulMatthews is offline Member
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    Re: The porter just stood there, expecting a tip.

    Quote Originally Posted by Son Ho View Post
    Could I express one of two actions by a present participle when they occur simultaneously? Are they exactly the same?

    1. The porter just stood there, expecting a tip.
    2. Standing there, the porter expected a tip.
    I think that question was answered in #2, #5 and #6.

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