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  1. #41
    tedmc is online now VIP Member
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    Re: I put the cooker on the gas and took it off gas after it blew vissle.

    Our noon whistle sounded exactly like this one
    :

    Isn't that the sound of a siren rather than a whistle?
    I am not a teacher or a native speaker.

  2. #42
    GoesStation is offline Moderator
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    Re: I put the cooker on the gas and took it off gas after it blew vissle.

    Quote Originally Posted by tedmc View Post
    Isn't that the sound of a siren rather than a whistle?
    Yes. It was called the noon whistle, presumably because it replaced a steam whistle.
    I am not a teacher.

  3. #43
    Rover_KE is offline Moderator
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    Re: I put the cooker on the gas and took it off gas after it blew vissle.

    Topic drift.

    Thread moved.

  4. #44
    Charlie Bernstein's Avatar
    Charlie Bernstein is offline VIP Member
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    Re: I put the cooker on the gas and took it off gas after it blew vissle.

    Quote Originally Posted by tufguy View Post
    What do you call this?

    https://www.google.com/aclk?sa=L&ai=...8Q8w56BQgBELwC

    Is it a cooker?
    We don't call it a cooker. We call it a pressure cooker.
    I'm not a teacher. I speak American English. I've tutored writing at the University of Southern Maine and have done a good deal of copy editing and writing, occasionally for publication.

  5. #45
    Charlie Bernstein's Avatar
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    Re: I put the cooker on the gas and took it off gas after it blew vissle.

    Quote Originally Posted by GoesStation View Post
    He's talking about a pressure cooker, not a kettle.
    I can't tell. He posted a picture of a pressure cooker, but I just thought he was showing us an example of the use of the word cooker.

    There might be pressure cookers with whistles, but I've never seen one that did.

    Hm.
    I'm not a teacher. I speak American English. I've tutored writing at the University of Southern Maine and have done a good deal of copy editing and writing, occasionally for publication.

  6. #46
    Charlie Bernstein's Avatar
    Charlie Bernstein is offline VIP Member
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    Re: I put the cooker on the gas and took it off gas after it blew vissle.

    Quote Originally Posted by tufguy View Post
    I put the kettle on the burner and took it off the burner when it whistled.

    Kettles don't blow whistles. Kettles' whistles blow. I don't understand at all.

    Your way is grammatical, but it's not as natural as other ways to phrase it.


    Should I be saying I took it off the burner after it whistle blew?

    As I we wouldn't use after. You took it off when the whistle blew.
    Notice that whistle can be either a noun or a verb. These are natual:

    - . . . when it whistled. (verb)
    - . . . when I heard it whistle. (verb)
    - . . . when the whistle blew. (noun)
    - . . . when its whistle blew. (noun)
    - . . . when I heard the whistle. (noun)
    I'm not a teacher. I speak American English. I've tutored writing at the University of Southern Maine and have done a good deal of copy editing and writing, occasionally for publication.

  7. #47
    Charlie Bernstein's Avatar
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    Re: I put the cooker on the gas and took it off gas after it blew vissle.

    Quote Originally Posted by tufguy View Post
    I don't understand "whistle blew". Could you please elaborate this?

    What is the correct way of using it?
    Blow is what the whistle did. The whistle blew.

    When you heard it, you took it off the stove.

    You might be reading it too literally. Technically, whistles don't do the blowing. You might be thinking: Something (or someone) must blow a whistle. They don't blow themselves.

    That's true. But even so, in English, we still say that a whistle blows.

    You can also say "when the kettle blew its whistle." That's both natural and logical, because then the whistle isn't blowing itself.
    I'm not a teacher. I speak American English. I've tutored writing at the University of Southern Maine and have done a good deal of copy editing and writing, occasionally for publication.

  8. #48
    Charlie Bernstein's Avatar
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    Re: I put the cooker on the gas and took it off gas after it blew vissle.

    Quote Originally Posted by Skrej View Post
    I don't currently own one, but I remember my mother using hers fairly frequently. It had a small vent hole to release pressure, upon which sat a very heavy metal knob that acted as the pressure regulator. It sat loosely on a small tube, and when the pressure built up enough to lift the heavy weight, a small amount of steam could escape from underneath it.

    Thus once the cooker got to pressure, it constantly hissed and made little tinging sounds as the weight lifted and settled. I can't remember if it made a whistle when done or not, but I actually kind of enjoyed that hissing and putt-putt-putting sound. It was almost like listening to a steam engine.

    However, one time I made the mistake of adding whole rosemary to whatever it was we were cooking. One of the individual little leaves somehow managed to get carried up into the steam release vent, so pressure kept building instead of seeping off.

    All of a sudden there was a very loud bang as what had essentially become a bomb on the stove blew some seals and spewed hot liquid all over the kitchen ceiling and immediate area. In the aftermath, we found a small rubber gasket or o-ring that had blown out of the lid where that pressure relief tube sat in the lid, with a piece of rosemary in it. I presume that was an intentional design feature so that instead of the entire pot exploding in metal shards like a grenade, this gasket failed first.

    It did however send that pressure relief weight high enough to dent the ceiling. I discovered this as I was on a step ladder trying to clean the red stains (apparently we were cooking something tomato based) off the ceiling. Eventually we just had to repaint the ceiling.

    As a result, to this day my mother still refuses to use a pressure cooker, and views rosemary with scorn.
    Wow.

    I hate those things. I used to work at a Kentucky Fried Chicken, back when they fried the chicken using pressure cookers on stoves. Few things in the world are more exciting than opening one of those pots. Defusing bombs, maybe.

    They didn't whistle.
    I'm not a teacher. I speak American English. I've tutored writing at the University of Southern Maine and have done a good deal of copy editing and writing, occasionally for publication.

  9. #49
    GoesStation is offline Moderator
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    Re: I put the cooker on the gas and took it off gas after it blew vissle.

    I am not a teacher.

  10. #50
    probus's Avatar
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    Re: I put the cooker on the gas and took it off gas after it blew vissle.

    Quote Originally Posted by jutfrank View Post
    Oh, um, yes, of course we do. And we only ever use a teapot, covered with a knitted cosy featuring a likeness of Her Maj.
    Knitted? How lowbrow. Ours is crocheted.
    Last edited by probus; 11-Feb-2021 at 19:42. Reason: Add emoji

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