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  1. #11
    Skrej's Avatar
    Skrej is offline Key Member
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    Re: Matt, do you want to kick us off?

    Quote Originally Posted by GoodTaste View Post
    "Kick the meeting off" - it sounds natural.
    "Kick the briefing off" - it sounds natural. But to make it terse, can we use "kick it off" instead?
    If by 'terse' you simply mean 'shorter', yes.


    Quote Originally Posted by GoodTaste View Post
    "Kick us off" sounds a bit unpleasant and not very natural since it is more or less like "piss us off" - see the context, Matt's questions appeared to be tough questions which forced Price to walk a fine line, because Biden promised to return to the WHO and now this spokesman cast doubt on its investigation.
    In the context of the original text, there's no sense of unpleasantness with 'kick us off' - just a bit of informality, perhaps. It has absolutely no connection to 'piss us off'. Sharing a similar construction does not mean they share meaning.

    Remember that phrasal verbs are highly idiomatic. You have to focus on the meaning, not the individual words.
    Wear short sleeves! Support your right to bare arms!

  2. #12
    GoesStation is offline Moderator
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    Re: Matt, do you want to kick us off?

    Quote Originally Posted by GoodTaste View Post
    "Kick us off" sounds a bit unpleasant and not very natural since it is more or less like "piss us off" .
    Remember that you aren't a native speaker. You can say you think it sounds that way. It doesn't, except maybe to a foreigner guessing at the intended meaning, but it's fine for you to guess that it does. When you say it sounds that way, you're stating an objective fact or, in this case, a falsehood. And it has absolutely nothing to do with the phrasal verb "piss someone off".

    Again, remember that you're not a native speaker. Don't presume to tell people what something "sounds like" as if it were an objective fact.
    I am not a teacher.

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