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  1. #11
    GoesStation is online now Moderator
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    Re: Ruined and ground

    Quote Originally Posted by Rachel Adams View Post
    Is it the same with "bad"? I can't find the video. It would be difficult without it. A speaker of AmE hardly pronounced the d in n "bad."
    It follows the usual pattern. If it's followed by certain consonants as in bad boy, bad manners, bad guy or bad juju, it reduces to what may be a barely-perceptible alveolar stop.
    I am not a teacher.

  2. #12
    Rachel Adams is offline Key Member
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    Re: Ruined and ground

    Quote Originally Posted by GoesStation View Post
    It follows the usual pattern. If it's followed by certain consonants as in bad boy, bad manners, bad guy or bad juju, it reduces to what may be a barely-perceptible alveolar stop.
    I remember it wasn't followed by other words. The phrase was: "It's so bad."

  3. #13
    GoesStation is online now Moderator
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    Re: Ruined and ground

    Quote Originally Posted by Rachel Adams View Post
    I remember it wasn't followed by other words. The phrase was: "It's so bad."
    A final /d/ without a following word also reduces to a stop in my dialect. We perceive it as a /d/; we notice if it's missing. Like the difference between can and can't, I can well imagine that a foreign ear could need a lot of training to be able to hear it.
    I am not a teacher.

  4. #14
    Rachel Adams is offline Key Member
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    Re: Ruined and ground

    Quote Originally Posted by GoesStation View Post
    A final /d/ without a following word also reduces to a stop in my dialect. We perceive it as a /d/; we notice if it's missing. Like the difference between can and can't, I can well imagine that a foreign ear could need a lot of training to be able to hear it.
    If I remember correctly in a video on YouTube about the difference between AmE and BrE pronunciation it was said that AmE speakers pronounce "can't" as "can". Is this the difference you mentioned, GoesStation?

  5. #15
    GoesStation is online now Moderator
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    Re: Ruined and ground

    Quote Originally Posted by Rachel Adams View Post
    If I remember correctly in a video on YouTube about the difference between AmE and BrE pronunciation it was said that AmE speakers pronounce "can't" as "can". Is this the difference you mentioned, GoesStation?
    The video was apparently about that area of pronunciation. Of course we don't pronounce "can't" as "can". If we did, we wouldn't be able to tell them apart. Can't ends in a stop; can doesn't. The difference is usually obvious to our ears, though you will sometimes hear someone ask "Did you say 'can' or 'can't?'"
    I am not a teacher.

  6. #16
    Charlie Bernstein's Avatar
    Charlie Bernstein is offline VIP Member
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    Re: Ruined and ground

    Quote Originally Posted by Rachel Adams View Post
    If I remember correctly in a video on YouTube about the difference between AmE and BrE pronunciation it was said that AmE speakers pronounce "can't" as "can". . . .
    Indeed we don't! That would be as useful as pronouncing "yes" like "no"!

    I'm sure your memory is correct. But the YouTube is incorrect.
    I'm not a teacher. I speak American English. I've tutored writing at the University of Southern Maine and have done a good deal of copy editing and writing, occasionally for publication.

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