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  1. #1
    Rachel Adams is offline Key Member
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    Ruined and ground

    Do native speakers pronounce consonants at the end of words? For example, I hear almost no "d" in "ruined" "ground". It starts at 2:38.


    https://m.youtube.com/watch?v=poCoLLy4AwU&feature=share

  2. #2
    GoesStation is online now Moderator
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    Re: Ruined and ground

    It's very clear in "ruined". He reduces it to an alveolar stop in "ground". This is typical pronunciation and is perceived as a /d/ by native speakers.
    I am not a teacher.

  3. #3
    Rachel Adams is offline Key Member
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    Re: Ruined and ground

    Quote Originally Posted by GoesStation View Post
    It's very clear in "ruined". He reduces it to an alveolar stop in "ground". This is typical pronunciation and is perceived as a /d/ by native speakers.
    When do native speakers reduce it to an alveolar stop? In which words?

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    Charlie Bernstein is online now VIP Member
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    Re: Ruined and ground

    Quote Originally Posted by Rachel Adams View Post
    When do native speakers reduce it to an alveolar stop? In which words?
    There are too many forms of English to give a complete answer. It depends on who's talking. I would use a hard D in ground, but his way is fine, too.

    It also depends on the other words in the sentence. For instance, if he were using the phrase ground up, the D would probably be more distinct.
    I'm not a teacher. I speak American English. I've tutored writing at the University of Southern Maine and have done a good deal of copy editing and writing, occasionally for publication.

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    SoothingDave is offline VIP Member
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    Re: Ruined and ground

    And talking about baseball, a "ground ball" would have little to no actual "d" sound in my dialect.

  6. #6
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    Re: Ruined and ground

    I hear the /d/ very clearly in both words. In ground, it's delayed slightly but clearly audible as a little click of his tongue coming off his alveolar ridge. Can members really not hear that?
    Last edited by jutfrank; 11-Feb-2021 at 18:33. Reason: correction

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    GoesStation is online now Moderator
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    Re: Ruined and ground

    Quote Originally Posted by jutfrank View Post
    I hear the /d/ very clearly in both words. In ground, it's delayed slightly but clearly audible as a little click of his tongue coming off his palate. Can members really not hear that?
    I do now. I didn't listen quite long enough before.
    I am not a teacher.

  8. #8
    Glizdka is offline Senior Member
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    Re: Ruined and ground

    Even Stewie in Family Guy pronounces the d in ruined, even though the gag is about his mispronouncing words.
    Last edited by Glizdka; 11-Feb-2021 at 19:34.

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    GoesStation is online now Moderator
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    Re: Ruined and ground

    Quote Originally Posted by Glizdka View Post
    Even Stewie in Family Guy pronounces the d in ruined, even though the gag is about his mispronouncing words.
    I just realized that you'll hear many people speaking my dialect say ruint. I'd call that an alternate past participle rather than a pronunciation quirk.
    I am not a teacher.

  10. #10
    Rachel Adams is offline Key Member
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    Re: Ruined and ground

    Quote Originally Posted by GoesStation View Post
    I just realized that you'll hear many people speaking my dialect say ruint. I'd call that an alternate past participle rather than a pronunciation quirk.
    Is it the same with "bad"? I can't find the video. It would be difficult without it. A speaker of AmE hardly prounced the d in n "bad."

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