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  1. #11
    SoothingDave is offline VIP Member
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    Re: /d/ sounds like a /t/ at the end of a word ?

    Quote Originally Posted by fruitninja View Post
    @GoesStation ^^ sorry, I misunderstood the word "Native Americans". What I mean is the people whose were born in the US, and their first language is American English.
    And, I know that -ed suffix if follows an unvoiced consonant sound, such as /k/, /p/,/ch/,.... is pronounced with a /t/ sound.
    Can you guys take a look at this Youtube clip that I've recently watched https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=hopLPVvfxbY&t=180s at 2:50 : " ...And you have as well the rubber tip on the end, which is the only thing....". The final 'd' in 'end' in this sentence sounds a lot like a /t/ to me. Is that really a /d/ sound ?
    No, it's clearly a t sound, but I don't know why. It's not normal and you should not do this.

  2. #12
    fruitninja is offline Newbie
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    Re: /d/ sounds like a /t/ at the end of a word ?

    Quote Originally Posted by SoothingDave View Post
    No, it's clearly a t sound, but I don't know why. It's not normal and you should not do this.
    Yes, it's strange, because it's different from what I learned. I took a bunch of English classes, and several ESL classes in a local college as well, but the teachers or the lessons never mentioned about this. Even now, google almost doesn't show any search results related to this , if type in the keywords: " d sounds like a t". As a English learner, it causes me confusion. When people say it this way, I still can understand them perfectly. But if I ever want to say it this way, I feel like they can perceive it as a different word, like 'ent'.
    Here's another example from a youtube video I watched a couple of months ago: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=lnz2gRPDzrA at 0:30 "...sending money to a friend...". Even clearer as a /t/ to me at 1:20 "...each transaction represents a packet of data that moves across a telecommunication network more than 10 million miles in length, and to end....". ( 'd' in 'world' at 0:05 " ..one of the most trusted and recognizable in the world..." sounds different than the above two, it's a /d/ sound to me).
    I started to notice this kind of usage, like 3 years ago. These days, I often spot these. ^^ It looks like an accepted way.
    Last edited by fruitninja; 12-Feb-2021 at 23:02.

  3. #13
    Glizdka is offline Senior Member
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    Re: /d/ sounds like a /t/ at the end of a word ?

    There's lots of things schools won't teach you. English is just a language. People speak it. People get sloppy when they speak. They take shortcuts. They make it easier for themselves. Reducing voiced consonants to unvoiced consonants is one of the things. Completely removing them is another. You live; you learn.

    Coach Shane has a great YouTube channel if you're interested in this kind of stuff.



    Here's a tip for you. Instead of giving us a link and saying at what minute/second the specific part you're talking about is, use the in-built timestamp feature.

    Click the "SHARE" button next to the (thumbs up) and (thumbs down) buttons, tick "Start at", type in the exact minute/second you want your link to direct to, and click "COPY".

    Your link should look like this: https://youtu.be/lnz2gRPDzrA?t=30

    Or you can always just manually add ?t=[time in seconds] at the end of your link.
    Last edited by Glizdka; 12-Feb-2021 at 23:32.

  4. #14
    GoesStation is offline Moderator
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    Re: /d/ sounds like a /t/ at the end of a word ?

    Quote Originally Posted by fruitninja View Post
    Here's another example from a youtube video I watched a couple of months ago: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=lnz2gRPDzrA at 0:30 "...sending money to a friend...". Even clearer as a /t/ to me at 1:20 "...each transaction represents a packet of data that moves across a telecommunication network more than 10 million miles in length, and to end....".
    I'm afraid I can't understand why those sound strange. The narrator is articulating extra carefully. She adds a bit of a breath after some final Ds. That makes the /d/ into something like a voiced D, a phoneme that doesn't normally exist in English. It's still a /d/ and perceived as such by native speakers. The one at :30 does edge into /t/ territory, The other one just sounds like a /d/ to me.
    Last edited by GoesStation; 13-Feb-2021 at 16:42. Reason: Fix a typo.
    I am not a teacher.

  5. #15
    Charlie Bernstein's Avatar
    Charlie Bernstein is offline VIP Member
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    Re: /d/ sounds like a /t/ at the end of a word ?

    Quote Originally Posted by fruitninja View Post
    I heard that many times, not a single case. For instance, in this example: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8evDJtPFTp0&t=72s at 1:05 , "...I learned that I prefer to have my work on one big screen, and, the reason for this is....". I'm pretty sure that the final 'd' in 'and' here is a /t/ sound. Did I hear it right?
    The Ds in learned and and are very distinctly pronounced D.

    In the video about the rolling machine, the audio is slightly muddy, so the Ds and Ts are too indistinct to judge.

    In fact, one of the differences between American and British English is just the opposite: In many, many words, we turn Ts into Ds. For example, little is pronounced lidl, and bottom is pronounced bodm. We also completely swallow the T in some words. Cotton is co-n and written is ri-n.
    Last edited by Charlie Bernstein; 14-Feb-2021 at 22:24.
    I'm not a teacher. I speak American English. I've tutored writing at the University of Southern Maine and have done a good deal of copy editing and writing, occasionally for publication.

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