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  1. #1
    Rachel Adams is offline Key Member
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    The final "e"

    According to the rule about the final "e," it affects the pronunciation of the first vowel in a word as in "nose" and "pine," but "post" /pəʊst/ doesn't end in "e," however the "o" still pronounced as /əʊ/. Are there no absolute rules regarding the "e" in words either and when it affects the pronunciation and when it doesn't?

  2. #2
    emsr2d2's Avatar
    emsr2d2 is offline Moderator
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    Re: The final "e"

    Never mind "post", the fact that the rule isn't a rule is demonstrated by the simple fact that "nose" doesn't rhyme with "lose".
    Remember - if you don't use correct capitalisation, punctuation and spacing, anything you write will be incorrect.

  3. #3
    Rover_KE is offline Moderator
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    Re: The final "e"

    Again, Rachel, 'Looking for rules to English pronunciation will, ultimately, drive you insane!' (emsr2d2) ... (especially 'absolute' rules).

  4. #4
    GoesStation is offline Moderator
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    Re: The final "e"

    Anglophone children learn to "sound out" words based on tendencies. There are few if any universal rules in English pronunciation.
    I am not a teacher.

  5. #5
    emsr2d2's Avatar
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    Re: The final "e"

    Here you go, Rachel. Enjoy. Come back to us with any questions once you've mastered all the pronunciations in this poem!

    Poem of English Pronunciation

    Dearest creature in creation,
    Study English pronunciation.
    I will teach you in my verse
    Sounds like corpse, corps, horse, and worse.
    I will keep you, Suzy, busy,
    Make your head with heat grow dizzy.
    Tear in eye, your dress will tear.
    So shall I! Oh hear my prayer.

    Just compare heart, beard, and heard,
    Dies and diet, lord and word,
    Sword and sward, retain and Britain.
    (Mind the latter, how it's written.)
    Now I surely will not plague you
    With such words as plaque and ague.
    But be careful how you speak:
    Say break and steak, but bleak and streak;
    Cloven, oven, how and low,
    Script, receipt, show, poem, and toe.

    Hear me say, devoid of trickery,
    Daughter, laughter, and Terpsichore,
    Typhoid, measles, topsails, aisles,
    Exiles, similes, and reviles;
    Scholar, vicar, and cigar,
    Solar, mica, war and far;
    One, anemone, Balmoral,
    Kitchen, lichen, laundry, laurel;
    Gertrude, German, wind and mind,
    Scene, Melpomene, mankind.

    Billet does not rhyme with ballet,
    Bouquet, wallet, mallet, chalet.
    Blood and flood are not like food,
    Nor is mould like should and would.
    Viscous, viscount, load and broad,
    Toward, to forward, to reward.
    And your pronunciation's OK
    When you correctly say croquet,
    Rounded, wounded, grieve and sieve,
    Friend and fiend, alive and live.

    Ivy, privy, famous; clamour
    And enamour rhymes with hammer.
    River, rival, tomb, bomb, comb,
    Doll and roll and some and home.
    Stranger does not rhyme with anger,
    Neither does devour with clangour.
    Souls but foul, haunt but aunt,
    Font, front, wont, want, grand, and grant,
    Shoes, goes, does. Now first say finger,
    And then singer, ginger, linger,
    Real, zeal, mauve, gauze, gouge and gauge,
    Marriage, foliage, mirage, and age.

    Query does not rhyme with very,
    Nor does fury sound like bury.
    Dost, lost, post and doth, cloth, loth.
    Job, nob, bosom, transom, oath.
    Though the differences seem little,
    We say actual but victual.
    Refer does not rhyme with deafer.
    Foeffer does, and zephyr, heifer.
    Mint, pint, senate and sedate;
    Dull, bull, and George ate late.
    Scenic, Arabic, Pacific,
    Science, conscience, scientific.

    Liberty, library, heave and heaven,
    Rachel, ache, moustache, eleven.
    We say hallowed, but allowed,
    People, leopard, towed, but vowed.
    Mark the differences, moreover,
    Between mover, cover, clover;
    Leeches, breeches, wise, precise,
    Chalice, but police and lice;
    Camel, constable, unstable,
    Principle, disciple, label.

    Petal, panel, and canal,
    Wait, surprise, plait, promise, pal.
    Worm and storm, chaise, chaos, chair,
    Senator, spectator, mayor.
    Tour, but our and succour, four.
    Gas, alas, and Arkansas.
    Sea, idea, Korea, area,
    Psalm, Maria, but malaria.
    Youth, south, southern, cleanse and clean.
    Doctrine, turpentine, marine.

    Compare alien with Italian,
    Dandelion and battalion.
    Sally with ally, yea, ye,
    Eye, I, ay, aye, whey, and key.
    Say aver, but ever, fever,
    Neither, leisure, skein, deceiver.
    Heron, granary, canary.
    Crevice and device and aerie.

    Face, but preface, not efface.
    Phlegm, phlegmatic, ass, glass, bass.
    Large, but target, gin, give, verging,
    Ought, out, joust and scour, scourging.
    Ear, but earn and wear and tear
    Do not rhyme with here but ere.

    Seven is right, but so is even,
    Hyphen, roughen, nephew Stephen,
    Monkey, donkey, Turk and jerk,
    Ask, grasp, wasp, and cork and work.
    Pronunciation -- think of Psyche!
    Is a paling stout and spikey?
    Won't it make you lose your wits,
    Writing groats and saying grits?
    It's a dark abyss or tunnel:
    Strewn with stones, stowed, solace, gunwale,
    Islington and Isle of Wight,
    Housewife, verdict and indict.

    Finally, which rhymes with enough?
    Though, through, plough, or dough, or cough?
    Hiccough has the sound of cup.
    My advice is give it up!

    Written by Gerard Nolst Trenité
    Remember - if you don't use correct capitalisation, punctuation and spacing, anything you write will be incorrect.

  6. #6
    Charlie Bernstein's Avatar
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    Re: The final "e"

    More:

    These rhyme with each other:

    giraffe
    laugh
    half
    decaf
    staff
    graph

    And these rhyme with each other, too:

    do
    who
    Sioux
    queue
    ewe
    you
    pooh
    shoe
    two
    brew
    due
    zoo
    view
    true
    roux
    moue

    And these words do NOT rhyme:

    stone
    done
    gone
    abalone

    Most Americans study English for at least twelve years — and still make mistakes.
    I'm not a teacher. I speak American English. I've tutored writing at the University of Southern Maine and have done a good deal of copy editing and writing, occasionally for publication.

  7. #7
    emsr2d2's Avatar
    emsr2d2 is offline Moderator
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    Re: The final "e"

    Quote Originally Posted by Charlie Bernstein View Post
    More:

    These rhyme with each other:

    giraffe
    laugh
    half
    decaf
    staff
    graph

    (They only rhyme in BrE if you're from somewhere north of the Watford Gap or west of Southampton. Where I'm from, "decaf" doesn't rhyme with the other five.)

    Most Americans study English for at least twelve years — and still make mistakes.
    My comment in blue above is just for information.

    Charlie, do American students really study pronunciation, though?
    Remember - if you don't use correct capitalisation, punctuation and spacing, anything you write will be incorrect.

  8. #8
    Charlie Bernstein's Avatar
    Charlie Bernstein is offline VIP Member
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    Re: The final "e"

    Quote Originally Posted by emsr2d2 View Post
    My comment in blue above is just for information.

    Charlie, do American students really study pronunciation, though?
    No, not at all. But students do get graded on spelling (and grammar) from first through twelfth grade — and often graduate without knowing how to spell. When I tutored college kids, hardly an afternoon went by without definately.

    How do you pronounce decaf? Here we say it sort of like kneecap.
    I'm not a teacher. I speak American English. I've tutored writing at the University of Southern Maine and have done a good deal of copy editing and writing, occasionally for publication.

  9. #9
    Tarheel's Avatar
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    Re: The final "e"

    I drink decaf
    And then I laugh.
    Or I don't
    Because I won't.
    Not a professional teacher

  10. #10
    emsr2d2's Avatar
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    Re: The final "e"

    Quote Originally Posted by Charlie Bernstein View Post
    How do you pronounce decaf? Here we say it sort of like kneecap.
    That's how we pronounce it too. The issue is that in the other five, the "a" is more like "ar" (without the rhotic "r") or "ah".
    Remember - if you don't use correct capitalisation, punctuation and spacing, anything you write will be incorrect.

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