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  1. #11
    jutfrank's Avatar
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    Re: Yesterday or today morning

    Quote Originally Posted by Piscean View Post
    I believe 'last evening' is used in some parts of the UK.
    Really? I don't mean to dispute this but I can say that I don't think I've ever heard anyone say that. Do you know which parts?

  2. #12
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    Re: Yesterday or today morning

    Of course, "last evening" can be used if "last" means "ultimate".

    It's our last evening here.
    What did you do on the last evening of your holiday?

    If referring to the evening before a day that's already more than a day ago at the time of speaking, we use "the previous evening".

    Last Wednesday, I got my hair cut. The previous evening, my friend had told me I looked like I'd been dragged through a hedge backwards so I knew it was time!
    Remember - if you don't use correct capitalisation, punctuation and spacing, anything you write will be incorrect.

  3. #13
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    Re: Yesterday or today morning

    I understood that Piscean and probus and GoesStation were all talking about last evening specifically to mean 'last night'. As in 'the evening of yesterday'. No?

  4. #14
    GoesStation is offline Moderator
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    Re: Yesterday or today morning

    Quote Originally Posted by jutfrank View Post
    I understood that Piscean and probus and GoesStation were all talking about last evening specifically to mean 'last night'. As in 'the evening of yesterday'. No?
    Correct.
    I am not a teacher.

  5. #15
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    Re: Yesterday or today morning

    Quote Originally Posted by jutfrank View Post
    I understood that Piscean and probus and GoesStation were all talking about last evening specifically to mean 'last night'. As in 'the evening of yesterday'. No?
    I realised that. I just wanted to make sure the OP understood that the words "last" and "evening" can be used together, just in a different context from the one discussed in this thread. I thought my original response might make it sound as if "last evening" could never appear in a sentence.
    Remember - if you don't use correct capitalisation, punctuation and spacing, anything you write will be incorrect.

  6. #16
    Charlie Bernstein's Avatar
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    Re: Yesterday or today morning

    Quote Originally Posted by Madness1 View Post
    I know it's "this morning", but it is strange to me that you wouldn't use "today morning" at all. . . .

    It shouldn't be strange. English is as idiomatic as most languages. There are ways we say things and ways we don't.

    I have never heard "today morning" until this thread. Never.


    And what about these?: "I didn't see Steve all day yesterday or this morning", or "I didn't see Steve at all yesterday or this morning".

    Those are good.
    Now you know!
    I'm not a teacher. I speak American English. I've tutored writing at the University of Southern Maine and have done a good deal of copy editing and writing, occasionally for publication.

  7. #17
    Madness1 is offline Newbie
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    Re: Yesterday or today morning

    Thanks for your responses. I could have sworn it was on British TV that I've heard a native English speaker uttering "today morning", but oh well. Maybe a regional thing?
    As a matter of fact, a lot of people in the UK use idioms from across the pond or other parts of the world. I think it has something to do with the Internet and TV. The point is, I have heard people who I believe are native speakers use phrases which I had been told are not used in the UK. This is where problems like the one in the first post come from: I hear native speakers say all sorts of things, I start saying them myself, and then eventually someone else corrects me because what I have said is apparently not standard or British

    Quote Originally Posted by emsr2d2 View Post
    Regardless of what you might have heard, the following are not used in the variants of English that we teach on this forum:

    Today morning
    Today afternoon
    Today evening
    Today night
    Yesterday night

    To refer to the day on which you are speaking, we use "this".

    We use "last night" to refer to the night (or evening) of yesterday. We don't say "last evening/afternoon/morning".

    You can use a day of the week with any time of day:
    Friday morning
    Friday afternoon
    Friday evening
    Friday night
    Most of the things you have explained to me here - "last night" rather than "last/yesterday evening", "tonight" rather than "today evening/night", etc - I already know. "Last night" is the previous evening, or yesterday in the evening. "Tonight" is this evening, or today in the evening. All that I know.

    I also know that "last morning/afternoon/evening" is possible in certain contexts, for instance: "on the last evening of my trip", "on the last afternoon of the year", "the last morning of her life", and so on.

    Quote Originally Posted by jutfrank View Post
    Don't worry about this. It is vanishingly unlikely that you would be misunderstood by anyone.
    In speech - probably not. In writing - more likely. I have been taught that it is good style to avoid ambiguities such as these just for clarity, but if you say to not worry about this I will just take your word for it.

  8. #18
    Charlie Bernstein's Avatar
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    Re: Yesterday or today morning

    Quote Originally Posted by Madness1 View Post
    Thanks for your responses. I could have sworn it was on British TV that I've heard a native English speaker uttering "today morning",

    Maybe it was Tuesday morning.


    but oh well. Maybe a regional thing?

    I've never heard it.


    As a matter of fact, a lot of people in the UK use idioms from across the pond or other parts of the world.

    Of course. I don't think today morning is one of them.


    I think it has something to do with the Internet and TV. The point is, I have heard people who I believe are native speakers use phrases which I had been told are not used in the UK. This is where problems like the one in the first post come from: I hear native speakers say all sorts of things, I start saying them myself, and then eventually someone else corrects me because what I have said is apparently not standard or British.

    Live and learn!


    Most of the things you have explained to me here - "last night" rather than "last/yesterday evening", "tonight" rather than "today evening/night", etc - I already know. "Last night" is the previous evening, or yesterday in the evening.

    Yesterday evening is more natural than yesterday in the evening. But last night is most likely.

    "Tonight" is this evening, or today in the evening.

    Today in the evening is wrong. Day isn't evening. Use tonight or this evening.


    All that I know.

    I also know that "last morning/afternoon/evening" is possible in certain contexts, for instance: "on the last evening of my trip", "on the last afternoon of the year", "the last morning of her life", and so on.

    In speech - probably not. In writing - more likely. I have been taught that it is good style to avoid ambiguities such as these just for clarity, but if you say to not worry about this I will just take your word for it.
    Stick with it. You're doing fine!
    Last edited by Charlie Bernstein; 17-Apr-2021 at 17:37.
    I'm not a teacher. I speak American English. I've tutored writing at the University of Southern Maine and have done a good deal of copy editing and writing, occasionally for publication.

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