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  1. #1
    Rameshram is offline Newbie
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    Phontics to English words

    Phonetics to English words

  2. #2
    Tdol is offline Editor, UsingEnglish.com
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    Re: Phontics to English words

    You will find the phonetics for words in almost every dictionary nowadays. I am not sure exactly what you're asking for.

  3. #3
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    emsr2d2 is offline Moderator
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    Re: Phontics to English words

    Quote Originally Posted by Rameshram View Post
    Phonetics to English words
    Welcome to the forum.

    Your sentence fragment above doesn't mean anything. You need to ask us an actual question. What exactly is it that you want to know?
    Remember - if you don't use correct capitalisation, punctuation and spacing, anything you write will be incorrect.

  4. #4
    Ketogene is offline Newbie
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    Re: Phontics to English words

    It would be great if there was a utility that allowed you to enter IPA symbols
    and get back the corresponding sounds.
    Perhaps as voiced from a selection of accents (UK, US, AUS etc)

    So let's take the word 'path': UK = /pɑːθ/ and US = /pæθ/
    What would: /paθ/ sound like ?
    Perhaps like a northern englisch accent with a short 'a' sound.

  5. #5
    jutfrank's Avatar
    jutfrank is offline VIP Member
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    Re: Phontics to English words

    Quote Originally Posted by Ketogene View Post
    It would be great if there was a utility that allowed you to enter IPA symbols
    and get back the corresponding sounds.
    https://itinerarium.github.io/phoneme-synthesis/

  6. #6
    Tdol is offline Editor, UsingEnglish.com
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    Re: Phontics to English words

    That's a cool tool. We have a typewriter too: https://www.e-lang.co.uk/mackichan/call/pron/type.html. All phonetic base are belong to us.

  7. #7
    Glizdka is offline Senior Member
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    Re: Phontics to English words

    Quote Originally Posted by Tdol View Post
    All phonetic base are belong to us.
    I learned of that meme some 20 years ago when playing Warcraft 3. It was a cheat code. When you typed "AllYourBaseAreBelongToUs", you won because all your enemy's base were belong to you. All the cheat codes in this game were memes, including ISeeDeadPeople, WhosYourDaddy, and TheIsNoSpoon.

    "All your base are belong to us" always reminds me of J. R. Oppenheimer's "Now I am become death". It's always bothered me why he worded it like that. I remember I read something about it being an archaic form of the present perfect that uses be instead of have as its auxiliary verb, and it's just a coincidence that the past participle of become is also become. I'd like to hear read what you think about his sentence.
    Last edited by Glizdka; 09-Apr-2021 at 06:04.

  8. #8
    emsr2d2's Avatar
    emsr2d2 is offline Moderator
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    Re: Phontics to English words

    I think we can safely say, after 11 days, that the OP isn't coming back. Thread closed.
    Remember - if you don't use correct capitalisation, punctuation and spacing, anything you write will be incorrect.

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