Page 6 of 7 First ... 2 3 4 5 6 7 Last
Results 51 to 60 of 64
  1. #51
    Alexey86 is offline Senior Member
    • Member Info
      • Member Type:
      • Student or Learner
      • Native Language:
      • Russian
      • Home Country:
      • Russian Federation
      • Current Location:
      • Russian Federation
    Join Date
    Nov 2018
    Posts
    869

    Re: This is a/the second time...

    Quote Originally Posted by 5jj View Post
    In the UK, the general expectation is that the sort of house most of us who live in houses live in has two floors.
    I see. So if I changed a second floor to a third/fourth floor, the indefinite article would work well, right?
    Not a teacher or native speaker

  2. #52
    5jj's Avatar
    5jj is offline VIP Member
    • Member Info
      • Member Type:
      • Retired English Teacher
      • Native Language:
      • British English
      • Home Country:
      • England
      • Current Location:
      • Czech Republic
    Join Date
    Oct 2010
    Posts
    28,449

    Re: This is a/the second time...

    In a society where the norm is two floors, yes.

  3. #53
    Alexey86 is offline Senior Member
    • Member Info
      • Member Type:
      • Student or Learner
      • Native Language:
      • Russian
      • Home Country:
      • Russian Federation
      • Current Location:
      • Russian Federation
    Join Date
    Nov 2018
    Posts
    869

    Re: This is a/the second time...

    Quote Originally Posted by 5jj View Post
    In a society where the norm is two floors, yes.
    And in societies with no norm at all, I guess.
    Not a teacher or native speaker

  4. #54
    Charlie Bernstein's Avatar
    Charlie Bernstein is offline VIP Member
    • Member Info
      • Member Type:
      • Other
      • Native Language:
      • English
      • Home Country:
      • United States
      • Current Location:
      • United States
    Join Date
    Jan 2009
    Posts
    9,470

    Re: This is a/the second time...

    Quote Originally Posted by Alexey86 View Post
    I see. So if I changed a second floor to a third/fourth floor, the indefinite article would work well, right?
    Yes, both a and the would work well.

    Grammatically and logically, there's no difference between going to a second floor or to a third or fourth floor in your example.
    Last edited by Charlie Bernstein; 11-Apr-2021 at 19:49.
    I'm not a teacher. I speak American English. I've tutored writing at the University of Southern Maine and have done a good deal of copy editing and writing, occasionally for publication.

  5. #55
    Charlie Bernstein's Avatar
    Charlie Bernstein is offline VIP Member
    • Member Info
      • Member Type:
      • Other
      • Native Language:
      • English
      • Home Country:
      • United States
      • Current Location:
      • United States
    Join Date
    Jan 2009
    Posts
    9,470

    Re: This is a/the second time...

    Quote Originally Posted by 5jj View Post
    In the UK, the general expectation is that the sort of house most of us who live in houses live in has two floors.
    In my US neighborhood, single-family houses are one, two, or three floors and apartment houses are two, three, or four.

    In the US, there's not a general expectation. You can live in a trailer, a house, a tenement, or a high-rise apartment building.
    I'm not a teacher. I speak American English. I've tutored writing at the University of Southern Maine and have done a good deal of copy editing and writing, occasionally for publication.

  6. #56
    Charlie Bernstein's Avatar
    Charlie Bernstein is offline VIP Member
    • Member Info
      • Member Type:
      • Other
      • Native Language:
      • English
      • Home Country:
      • United States
      • Current Location:
      • United States
    Join Date
    Jan 2009
    Posts
    9,470

    Re: This is a/the second time...

    Quote Originally Posted by Alexey86 View Post
    Can we apply this to my example?

    "By the way, I'm building a house in Austin and finishing a second floor (this is new information to the listener + (s)he doesn't know how many floors I'm going to build).
    Yes, you can use a or the.
    I'm not a teacher. I speak American English. I've tutored writing at the University of Southern Maine and have done a good deal of copy editing and writing, occasionally for publication.

  7. #57
    emsr2d2's Avatar
    emsr2d2 is offline Moderator
    • Member Info
      • Member Type:
      • English Teacher
      • Native Language:
      • British English
      • Home Country:
      • UK
      • Current Location:
      • UK
    Join Date
    Jul 2009
    Posts
    60,771

    Re: This is a/the second time...

    Quote Originally Posted by Charlie Bernstein View Post
    In the US, there's not a general expectation. You can live in a trailer, a house, a tenement, or a high-rise apartment building.
    I think you misunderstood 5jj's point. He wasn't saying that there is a general expectation that people live in a house. He meant that if we describe our home specifically as a "house", most people understand that to be a building with at least two floors. As someone already said, a one-story house is a bungalow. A three-storey terraced house (one with an adjoining house on each side) is frequently called a town house.
    Remember - if you don't use correct capitalisation, punctuation and spacing, anything you write will be incorrect.

  8. #58
    GoesStation is offline Moderator
    • Member Info
      • Member Type:
      • Interested in Language
      • Native Language:
      • American English
      • Home Country:
      • United States
      • Current Location:
      • United States
    Join Date
    Dec 2015
    Posts
    22,003

    Re: This is a/the second time...

    Quote Originally Posted by emsr2d2 View Post
    I think you misunderstood 5jj's point. He wasn't saying that there is a general expectation that people live in a house. He meant that if we describe our home specifically as a "house", most people understand that to be a building with at least two floors. As someone already said, a one-story house is a bungalow. A three-storey terraced house (one with an adjoining house on each side) is frequently called a town house.
    That's not the case in American English. Any permanent, fully-detached, single-family living structure is a house in American English. Duplexes and triplexes, which respectively accommodate two and three families, are also houses to us. The latter are usually more than a single level but that doesn't affect what they're called.
    I am not a teacher.

  9. #59
    probus's Avatar
    probus is online now Moderator
    • Member Info
      • Member Type:
      • Retired English Teacher
      • Native Language:
      • English
      • Home Country:
      • Canada
      • Current Location:
      • Canada
    Join Date
    Jan 2011
    Posts
    5,617

    Re: This is a/the second time...

    I'm sure then that this is one of the few differences between American and Canadian usage. In Canada, whenever you tell someone your street address they almost always ask "Is that a house or an apartment?"

  10. #60
    GoesStation is offline Moderator
    • Member Info
      • Member Type:
      • Interested in Language
      • Native Language:
      • American English
      • Home Country:
      • United States
      • Current Location:
      • United States
    Join Date
    Dec 2015
    Posts
    22,003

    Re: This is a/the second time...

    It took me quite a while after I moved to Canada to learn what semi-detached and detached houses were. (The former is what Americans call half of a duplex; the latter is what we call an ordinary house.)
    I am not a teacher.

Page 6 of 7 First ... 2 3 4 5 6 7 Last

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •