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#1
Alice Chu is offline Member
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The weather is changing now.

Please tell me if my understanding is correct.
Examples of inchoative verbs:
open, close, start/begin, end, stop, die, finish, accomplish, complete, get/grow/turn/become, change, happen, ripen, mature, appear/show up, disappear, freeze, melt, widen, liquefy, strengthen, thicken, flatten

Inchoative verbs indicate a change of state which happens on its own and also show a process of beginning or becoming. They are also intransitive verbs without objects.

When inchoative verbs express a process of beginning or becoming, they can be used in progressive tenses. The sentences below are correct.
1) The door is opening now.
2) The weather is changing now.
3) The apples are ripening now.
4) The ice is melting now.
5) The sun is appearing now.

When inchoative verbs express a change of state which happens on its own, they cannot be used with “for” or “since” to indicate something happening for a period of time. The sentences below are incorrect.
1) The door has been opening for a while.
2) The weather has been changing since last night.
3) The apples have been ripening for two days.
4) The ice has been melting for an hour.
5) The sun has been appearing for a few minutes.
Although I am an English teacher, I still need to improve my English. I appreciate your help and kindness.

#2
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Charlie Bernstein is offline VIP Member
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Re: The weather is changing now.

Quote Originally Posted by Alice Chu View Post
Please tell me if my understanding is correct.
Examples of inchoative verbs:
open, close, start/begin, end, stop, die, finish, accomplish, complete, get/grow/turn/become, change, happen, ripen, mature, appear/show up, disappear, freeze, melt, widen, liquefy, strengthen, thicken, flatten

Inchoative verbs indicate a change of state which happens on its own and also show a process of beginning or becoming. They are also intransitive verbs without objects.

When inchoative verbs express a process of beginning or becoming, they can be used in progressive tenses. The sentences below are correct.
1) The door is opening now.
2) The weather is changing now.
3) The apples are ripening now.
4) The ice is melting now.
5) The sun is appearing now.

Those are fine.

When inchoative verbs express a change of state which happens on its own, they cannot be used with “for” or “since” to indicate something happening for a period of time. The sentences below are incorrect.
1) The door has been opening for a while.

Unlikely but possible.


2) The weather has been changing since last night.

Unlikely, but possible in some contexts: It was stormy last night, but it's been changing this morning. I hope it will be gone soon!


3) The apples have been ripening for two days.

Fine.

4) The ice has been melting for an hour.

Fine.


5) The sun has been appearing for a few minutes.

Not likely, but possible in some contexts — for instance, if it has been going in and out all day.
All your examples are grammatical.
I'm not a teacher. I speak American English. I've tutored writing at the University of Southern Maine and have done a good deal of copy editing and writing, occasionally for publication.

#3
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jutfrank is online now VIP Member
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Re: The weather is changing now.

Quote Originally Posted by Alice Chu View Post
When inchoative verbs express a process of beginning or becoming, they can be used in progressive tenses. The sentences below are correct.
1) The door is opening now.
2) The weather is changing now.
3) The apples are ripening now.
4) The ice is melting now.
5) The sun is appearing now.
Okay, I think that's correct, yes. Those sentences all express processes.

When inchoative verbs express a change of state which happens on its own, they cannot be used with “for” or “since” to indicate something happening for a period of time. The sentences below are incorrect.
1) The door has been opening for a while.
2) The weather has been changing since last night.
3) The apples have been ripening for two days.
4) The ice has been melting for an hour.
5) The sun has been appearing for a few minutes.
I think that's basically wrong. Plus, your examples are wrong, since none of them express a change of state in the way I think you mean. They are all expressing processes. Remember that a change from one state to another usually is a process. Look:

S1: not married
S2: married

S1 and S2 are both states. So if you want to express a change from S1 to S2, you can use a process verb. In this case, we use the verb get married.

Now you could ask this question: At a wedding, what is the exact point that the bride and groom becomes husband and wife? There must be some timeless event, a point in conceptual space where they stop being single and 'become' married. In that sense, you can call get married an inceptive/inchoative verb because it has as part of it sense the idea of a new state coming into existence. If you look at it like this, the change of state does not happen in time at all, and therefore cannot be durative, because the very definition of inception is that it is non-durative. Furthermore, it cannot be said to be a process. Does that make sense?

However, you can look at this in another way. This other way relies on a conception of the change of state being a process, which means that it is necessarily durative. You can say that 'getting married' is not purely abstract, transitional, and timeless, but rather is a set of events happening over time. From this point of view, we can conceive of getting married as an 'extended event'. We can imagine for example, the events that lead up to (and even follow) the wedding. We can imagine the bride getting out of the car and walking up the aisle. We can imagine sitting in the church as the groom says his vows and thinking 'They're getting married'. The fact that we use a progressive aspect to express this thought means that we conceive of the event as a durative process.
Last edited by jutfrank; 11-Apr-2021 at 18:46.

#4
Alice Chu is offline Member
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Re: The weather is changing now.

Quote Originally Posted by jutfrank View Post
Okay, I think that's correct, yes. Those sentences all express processes.
The first, second and third sentences are correct, but the others aren’t. Am I right?
1) Amy and Tom are getting married now.
2) Amy and Tom have been getting married for ten minutes.
3) Amy and Tom have been married for ten years.
4) Amy and Tom have been getting married for ten years.
5) Amy and Tom have got married for ten years.
Last edited by GoesStation; 15-Apr-2021 at 14:28. Reason: Fix quote box.
Although I am an English teacher, I still need to improve my English. I appreciate your help and kindness.

#5
GoesStation is offline Moderator
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Re: The weather is changing now.

Quote Originally Posted by Alice Chu View Post
The first, second and third sentences are correct, but the others aren’t. Am I right?
1) Amy and Tom are getting married now.
2) Amy and Tom have been getting married for ten minutes.
3) Amy and Tom have been married for ten years.
4) Amy and Tom have been getting married for ten years.
5) Amy and Tom have got married for ten years.
Getting married is a short-term process. You can't normally use a duration term with it.
I am not a teacher.

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