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#31
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Re: Live, work, study and learn with the present perfect and progressive

Quote Originally Posted by Rachel Adams View Post
The continuous and the present perfect indicate the same thing when used with some verbs such as "live" and "work"
I would not say they meant the same thing. If a different form is used, there is almost always some difference in meaning, however slight. However, with these two verbs, the difference in some contexts is, for practical purposes, insignificant.
but are there other verbs or is it just these two verbs?
There are others. I, for example, see no significant difference between I have watched westerns for over seventy years and I have been watching westerns for over seventy years.
Last edited by Rover_KE; 14-Apr-2021 at 15:15. Reason: fixing quote box

#32
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Re: Live, work, study and learn with the present perfect and progressive

Quote Originally Posted by 5jj View Post
It is possible to say:

I'm moving to a new house today. I lived here for twenty years! I'll really miss it.
I'm moving to a new house today. I have lived here for twenty years! I'll really miss it.
I'm moving to a new house today. I have been living here for twenty years! I'll really miss it.
You said you would use the present perfect non-continuous form in:

"I'm moving to a new house today. I've lived here for twenty years! I'll really miss it.
I've worked here for ten years and I've loved every minute of it. I'll miss you all." Do you mean you wouldn't use the progressive in "I have been working..?" It's amazing how everything depends on context. All three tenses are correct in "I lived," "I have lived," and "I have been living." I am talking about your quoted examples.
Can I use the following idea if it can be called an idea as a general guidance? I am judging by the examples I read in this discussion. I moving out of the house (now) or I am in a similar situation, when something is no longer in progress. I am standing outside the house. I no longer live there. I use the past simple. On the last day of working or living somewhere as in your examples I see that all three tenses the present perfect, the present perfect continuous and the past simple are all possible. As in the quoted part above. Before the final day only the present perfect continuous works because the action is still in progress but when the day is finished both the present perfect and the past simple are correct.
Last edited by Rachel Adams; 15-Apr-2021 at 11:59.

#33
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Re: Live, work, study and learn with the present perfect and progressive

Rachel, you seem to be trying to find rules that tell you exactly what tense/aspect we can use closely defined in minutes or hours. We don't work that way. We don't plan the tense/aspect we are going to use in speech (though we may in careful writing). We say the words that spring into our mind. It's probable that if part of our mind is focused on the pastness of a situation, even if it is not fully past, then we will use a past tense. If it's focused on the continuation up to the (near-)present), even if it is actually past, we will use a present perfect form. If it's focused on the ongoingness/duration of the situation, even if it is now past, we may use a present perfect progressive. If three of the people who have responded so far were to find themselves in exactly identical situations, each might use a different form.

Stop trying to pin things down too exactly. There are no hard-and-fast rules for the uses of tenses/aspects in every situation you might encounter.

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