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  1. #1
    Rachel Adams is offline Key Member
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    The date with "homework" or "classwork"

    I am trying to find my post about writing dates. I may have asked a similar question about dates before, but I am not sure I asked the question about the required written form in local schools and colleges. I was taught that when announcing a date, writing "on the thirtieth of April" is formal. Writing "on the 10th of April" (with of without "th" doesn't matter) is ever very rare. But if I am not announcing a date, if I write in my notebook "the thirtieth of April" or "the 30th of April" and add "classwork" or "homework" would these forms still be very formal?

  2. #2
    emsr2d2's Avatar
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    Re: The date with "homework" or "classwork"

    If you're writing it in your own notebook and no one else will see it, does it matter?
    Remember - if you don't use correct capitalisation, punctuation and spacing, anything you write will be incorrect.

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    GoesStation is offline Moderator
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    Re: The date with "homework" or "classwork"

    I'd write "4/30".
    I am not a teacher.

  4. #4
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    Re: The date with "homework" or "classwork"

    And I'd write "30/4" or "30 Apr/April".
    Remember - if you don't use correct capitalisation, punctuation and spacing, anything you write will be incorrect.

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    Rover_KE is offline Moderator
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    Re: The date with "homework" or "classwork"

    GS would write that because American English speakers typically put the month first.

    British English speakers are more likely to write 30/4.
    Last edited by emsr2d2; 30-Apr-2021 at 17:59. Reason: Fixed typo

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    Rachel Adams is offline Key Member
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    Re: The date with "homework" or "classwork"

    Quote Originally Posted by emsr2d2 View Post
    If you're writing it in your own notebook and no one else will see it, does it matter?
    It doesn't. But in local schools these forms are used "the thirtieth of April" or "the 30th of April" and then under it students usually add "classwork" or "homework." I was wondering what native speakers think about it. The teachers who insist on these forms are not native speakers.

  7. #7
    emsr2d2's Avatar
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    Re: The date with "homework" or "classwork"

    Quote Originally Posted by Rachel Adams View Post
    It doesn't. But in local schools these forms are used "the thirtieth of April" or "the 30th of April" and then under it students usually add "classwork" or "homework." I was wondering what native speakers think about it. The teachers who insist on these forms are not native speakers.
    If a student handed in work with "Homework, the thirtieth of April" at the top, I would change it. I won't call it "correcting it" because there's nothing wrong with the words at all. It is, however, extremely unnatural. I might leave "the 30th of April" as it is.

    I would use "thirtieth" (or similar) only in a legal document or a script/novel etc. When I'm simply writing the date, I'd use the forms I put in post #4.
    Remember - if you don't use correct capitalisation, punctuation and spacing, anything you write will be incorrect.

  8. #8
    Rachel Adams is offline Key Member
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    Re: The date with "homework" or "classwork"

    Quote Originally Posted by emsr2d2 View Post
    If a student handed in work with "Homework, the thirtieth of April" at the top, I would change it. I won't call it "correcting it" because there's nothing wrong with the words at all. It is, however, extremely unnatural. I might leave "the 30th of April" as it is.

    I would use "thirtieth" (or similar) only in a legal document or a script/novel etc. When I'm simply writing the date, I'd use the forms I put in post #4.
    Which forms were and are still acceptable in schools, colleges and universities in the UK? The forms you mentioned in post #4 or this one "1(st) May"?

    You said you might leave "the 30th of April" as it is, but it doesn't look natural either, does it? In the same situation when a student handed in work with "Homework and the 30th of April".
    Last edited by Rachel Adams; 01-May-2021 at 07:20.

  9. #9
    emsr2d2's Avatar
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    Re: The date with "homework" or "classwork"

    Quote Originally Posted by Rachel Adams View Post
    Which forms were and are still acceptable in schools, colleges and universities in the UK? The forms you mentioned in post #4 or this one "1(st) May"?

    You said you might leave "the 30th of April" as it is, but it doesn't look natural either, does it?
    I don't work in a school here so I don't know what's encouraged at public institutions. I can only talk about my private students and what I would expect to see in general life.

    It would depend on the age of the student. If a six-year-old handed in homework with that at the top, I would leave it alone because I wouldn't want to be overly critical of something that is actually grammatically correct. If a fifteen-year-old handed in homework with that at the top, I would change it and explain why/how it's unnatural and unnecessary.
    Remember - if you don't use correct capitalisation, punctuation and spacing, anything you write will be incorrect.

  10. #10
    Rachel Adams is offline Key Member
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    Re: The date with "homework" or "classwork"

    Quote Originally Posted by emsr2d2 View Post
    I don't work in a school here so I don't know what's encouraged at public institutions. I can only talk about my private students and what I would expect to see in general life.

    It would depend on the age of the student. If a six-year-old handed in homework with that at the top, I would leave it alone because I wouldn't want to be overly critical of something that is actually grammatically correct. If a fifteen-year-old handed in homework with that at the top, I would change it and explain why/how it's unnatural and unnecessary.
    When writing "th", "rd" and "st" in your copybook, should it be written above the digit or next to it as in 1st, 2nd, 3rd, 4th or the superscript?

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