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  1. #11
    Charlie Bernstein's Avatar
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    Re: Jane went to the kitchen

    Quote Originally Posted by jutfrank View Post
    I think it's fine to use on Bourbon in the context of the OP if the idea is that she's behaving under Bourbon's particular effect.
    I'd just say drunk.
    I'm not a teacher. I speak American English. I've tutored writing at the University of Southern Maine and have done a good deal of copy editing and writing, occasionally for publication.

  2. #12
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    Re: Jane went to the kitchen

    Quote Originally Posted by Charlie Bernstein View Post
    It doesn't.
    Sure it does. All alcoholic drinks, and all drugs in fact, have distinctly different effects. That's the point that alpacinoutd was getting at, I guess.

  3. #13
    Charlie Bernstein's Avatar
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    Re: Jane went to the kitchen

    Quote Originally Posted by jutfrank View Post
    Sure it does. All alcoholic drinks, and all drugs in fact, have distinctly different effects. That's the point that alpacinoutd was getting at, I guess.
    Bourbon does not do anything to you that gin or vodka do, booze mythology notwithstanding. I speak from extensive field research.

    In American English, you can be on coke, smack, speed, or acid, but we're not likely to say someone is on booze or any of its varieties. We'd typically say someone is drunk (or one of its myriad colorful synonyms).

    When we want to be more specific, then we might say someone is drunk on bourbon or gin or wine or beer or whatever.

    British English might be different.
    I'm not a teacher. I speak American English. I've tutored writing at the University of Southern Maine and have done a good deal of copy editing and writing, occasionally for publication.

  4. #14
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    Re: Jane went to the kitchen

    I think there's some confusion here. I don't think anyone has said that "is on + name of booze" is the same as saying "is drunk". It's used to mean "is drinking + name of booze".

    Me: I feel dreadful. I was on neat vodka at the party last night.
    Friend: I feel fine, but I stayed on beer all evening.
    Me: I'll never learn! Mind you, at least I didn't start on vodka then swap to whisky.
    Friend: True. You'd probably be dead this morning, not just hung over!
    Remember - if you don't use correct capitalisation, punctuation and spacing, anything you write will be incorrect.

  5. #15
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    Re: Jane went to the kitchen

    I have to disagree that the effects of gin, vodka, and whisky are all the same and I'm quite surprised one would think so. Also, I'm pretty sure there's no difference between British or American usage here.

    I think the oddness of the phrase on Bourbon simply comes from the fact that you don't imagine that Bourbon can have a distinctive effect. If you think it can, then it sounds fine. That's not a cultural difference, it's a personal one. I personally think it's okay in principle, although I do think the context of the OP is odd because it's so hard to imagine that anybody could think or say such a thing.
    Last edited by jutfrank; 08-May-2021 at 21:19.

  6. #16
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    Re: Jane went to the kitchen

    Quote Originally Posted by emsr2d2 View Post
    It's used to mean "is drinking + name of booze".
    Yes. And by extension, 'is under the effect of'.

    I didn't mean to suggest that if you're under the effect of alcohol that you're necessarily drunk.

  7. #17
    Charlie Bernstein's Avatar
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    Re: Jane went to the kitchen

    Quote Originally Posted by jutfrank View Post
    I have to disagree that the effects of gin, vodka, and whisky are all the same and I'm quite surprised one would think so. Also, I'm pretty sure there's no difference between British or American usage here.

    I think the oddness of the phrase on Bourbon simply comes from the fact that you don't imagine that Bourbon can have a distinctive effect. If you think it can, then it sounds fine. That's not a cultural difference, it's a personal one. I personally think it's okay in principle, although I do think the context of the OP is odd because it's so hard to imagine that anybody could think or say such a thing.
    We agree to disagree. I've never heard anyone say "on bourbon," "on vodka," or "on gin."

    Never, as in not ever.
    I'm not a teacher. I speak American English. I've tutored writing at the University of Southern Maine and have done a good deal of copy editing and writing, occasionally for publication.

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