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  1. #1
    Rachel Adams is offline Key Member
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    For good reason

    Can I use the expression "for good reason" in this way in my sentence?

    "Many people associate Georgia with mountains and for good reason, because it's the mountains that are the hallmark of Georgia. For example, Mount Kazbek is the most famous and favourite mountain for me and many tourists. It is rich in beautiful landscapes regardless of the time of year. It's top is often hidden by clouds."

    I again provided the rest of the context to show how I was going to use my sentence.

  2. #2
    5jj's Avatar
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    Re: For good reason

    Quote Originally Posted by Rachel Adams View Post

    "Many people associate Georgia with mountains and for good reason, because it's the mountains that are the hallmark of Georgia.
    It would be OK if you stopped after 'reason'. As it is, your sentence says Many people associate Georgia with mountains because it's famous for its mountains.
    Last edited by 5jj; 07-May-2021 at 13:01.

  3. #3
    Rachel Adams is offline Key Member
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    Re: For good reason

    [QUOTE=5jj;1699621]
    Quote Originally Posted by Rachel Adams View Post

    "Many people associate Georgia with mountains and for good reason, because it's the mountains that are the hallmark of Georgia. /QUOTE]
    It would be OK if you stopped after 'reason'. As it is, your sentence says Many people associate Georgia with mountains because it's famous for its mountains.
    "Because it's the mountains that are the hallmark of Georgia" is repetition, isn't it?
    Is the rest of the text correct?

  4. #4
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    Re: For good reason

    Quote Originally Posted by Rachel Adams View Post

    "Because it's the mountains that are the hallmark of Georgia" is repetitious, isn't it?

    Yes, a bit.

    Is the rest of the text correct?

    See post #5.
    Last edited by Tarheel; 07-May-2021 at 13:25.
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  5. #5
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    Re: For good reason

    Quote Originally Posted by Rachel Adams View Post
    Can I use the expression "for good reason" in this way in my sentence?

    "Many people associate Georgia with mountains and for good reason. For example, Mount Kazbek is the most famous and favourite mountain for me and for many tourists. It is rich in beautiful landscapes regardless of the time of year. Its top is often hidden by clouds."
    Try that!
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  6. #6
    Rachel Adams is offline Key Member
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    Re: For good reason

    Quote Originally Posted by Tarheel View Post
    Try that!
    Thank you. So native speakers of English don't use "with" instead of "by" in such contexts. "The walls are covered by clouds" not "with clouds" and "the walls are covered by snow" not "with snow." Do I understand correctly?

  7. #7
    GoesStation is online now Moderator
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    Re: For good reason

    Quote Originally Posted by Rachel Adams View Post
    So native speakers of English don't use "with" instead of "by" in such contexts. "The walls are covered by clouds" not "with clouds" and "the walls are covered by snow" not "with snow." Do I understand correctly?
    No. Sentence one doesn't make sense. "With snow" is more likely in sentence two, but "by" is also possible.
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  8. #8
    Rachel Adams is offline Key Member
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    Re: For good reason

    Quote Originally Posted by GoesStation View Post
    No. Sentence one doesn't make sense. "With snow" is more likely in sentence two, but "by" is also possible.
    Oh, I typed "clouds" instead of "snow". Sorry. In this sentence "the top of the mountain is covered by clouds" or "with clouds" the use of the preposition is the same, isn't it? Both are correct.

  9. #9
    GoesStation is online now Moderator
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    Re: For good reason

    Quote Originally Posted by Rachel Adams View Post
    In this sentence, "the top of the mountain is covered by clouds" or "with clouds", the use of the preposition is the same, isn't it?
    I don't understand the question. I wouldn't use "covered"; I'd say its hidden by clouds.
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  10. #10
    Rachel Adams is offline Key Member
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    Re: For good reason

    Quote Originally Posted by GoesStation View Post
    I don't understand the question. I wouldn't use "covered"; I'd say its hidden by clouds.
    I didn't know that "is covered by clouds" is wrong. Or is it your personal preference?

    In a similar context would it be wrong to use "covered" when talking about "the fog"?
    For example, "the church on the top of the hill was covered by/with fog?" or is it better to say "the church on the top of the hill is hidden by/with fog"?

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