Results 1 to 8 of 8
  1. #1
    mrwroc's Avatar
    mrwroc is offline Member
    • Member Info
      • Member Type:
      • Interested in Language
      • Native Language:
      • Polish
      • Home Country:
      • Poland
      • Current Location:
      • Poland
    Join Date
    Apr 2020
    Posts
    105

    at a meeting vs in a meeting

    I wanted to ask here:
    https://www.usingenglish.com/forum/t...s-in-a-meeting
    But someone closed the thread.

    So the difference between "in a meeting" and "at a meeting" is almost unnoticeable.
    Which version is more common? "in a meeting"?

    Can I always use one version? For example, can I change:
    - Did you get any work done yesterday afternoon?
    - No, none at all. I was at a meeting from 1pm until 7pm.

    to:

    - Did you get any work done yesterday afternoon?
    - No, none at all. I was in a meeting from 1pm until 7pm.
    Last edited by emsr2d2; 11-May-2021 at 18:52. Reason: Removed quote boxes so we can quote text in responses

  2. #2
    emsr2d2's Avatar
    emsr2d2 is offline Moderator
    • Member Info
      • Member Type:
      • English Teacher
      • Native Language:
      • British English
      • Home Country:
      • UK
      • Current Location:
      • UK
    Join Date
    Jul 2009
    Posts
    60,769

    Re: at a meeting vs in a meeting

    Quote Originally Posted by mrwroc View Post
    I wanted to ask a question here: at https://www.usingenglish.com/forum/t...s-in-a-meeting
    but someone closed the thread has been closed.

    So Am I right in thinking that the difference between "in a meeting" and "at a meeting" is almost unnoticeable? Which version is more common? Is it "in a meeting"?

    Can I always use one version? For example, can I change:
    - Did you get any work done yesterday afternoon?
    - No, none at all. I was at a meeting from 1pm until 7pm.

    to:

    - Did you get any work done yesterday afternoon?
    - No, none at all. I was in a meeting from 1pm until 7pm.
    In that context, yes, you can change it. We rarely say "always" so I won't say that you can always use just one of them.
    Remember - if you don't use correct capitalisation, punctuation and spacing, anything you write will be incorrect.

  3. #3
    jutfrank's Avatar
    jutfrank is online now VIP Member
    • Member Info
      • Member Type:
      • English Teacher
      • Native Language:
      • English
      • Home Country:
      • England
      • Current Location:
      • England
    Join Date
    Mar 2014
    Posts
    14,751

    Re: at a meeting vs in a meeting

    I agree with emsr2d2. In this context, both prepositions work fine. In other contexts, the difference in meaning between them would be more apparent.

  4. #4
    emsr2d2's Avatar
    emsr2d2 is offline Moderator
    • Member Info
      • Member Type:
      • English Teacher
      • Native Language:
      • British English
      • Home Country:
      • UK
      • Current Location:
      • UK
    Join Date
    Jul 2009
    Posts
    60,769

    Re: at a meeting vs in a meeting

    By the way, the reason you couldn't add a post to that thread is that it was from 2012. When a thread hasn't had any new responses for two years (I think), it's automatically closed.
    Remember - if you don't use correct capitalisation, punctuation and spacing, anything you write will be incorrect.

  5. #5
    probus's Avatar
    probus is offline Moderator
    • Member Info
      • Member Type:
      • Retired English Teacher
      • Native Language:
      • English
      • Home Country:
      • Canada
      • Current Location:
      • Canada
    Join Date
    Jan 2011
    Posts
    5,611

    Re: at a meeting vs in a meeting

    Quote Originally Posted by mrwroc View Post
    So the difference between "in a meeting" and "at a meeting" is almost unnoticeable.
    I strongly disagree that the difference is "almost unnoticeable" and I don't think anyone said it was. "In a meeting" implies that the meeting is here and currently in progress. "At a meeting" is used if the meeting is elsewhere.
    Last edited by Rover_KE; 12-May-2021 at 08:14. Reason: pruning the lengthy quote

  6. #6
    Tdol is offline Editor, UsingEnglish.com
    • Member Info
      • Member Type:
      • English Teacher
      • Native Language:
      • British English
      • Home Country:
      • UK
      • Current Location:
      • Japan
    Join Date
    Nov 2002
    Posts
    73,677

    Re: at a meeting vs in a meeting

    Quote Originally Posted by emsr2d2 View Post
    By the way, the reason you couldn't add a post to that thread is that it was from 2012. When a thread hasn't had any new responses for two years (I think), it's automatically closed.
    Threads are closed automatically to reduce spam. They can be re-opened.

  7. #7
    probus's Avatar
    probus is offline Moderator
    • Member Info
      • Member Type:
      • Retired English Teacher
      • Native Language:
      • English
      • Home Country:
      • Canada
      • Current Location:
      • Canada
    Join Date
    Jan 2011
    Posts
    5,611

    Re: at a meeting vs in a meeting

    And spammers have become increasingly tricky. They've been known to create innocuous threads, leave them dormant for a while, then add spam after a few months.
    Last edited by emsr2d2; 12-May-2021 at 20:38. Reason: Fixed typo

  8. #8
    Tdol is offline Editor, UsingEnglish.com
    • Member Info
      • Member Type:
      • English Teacher
      • Native Language:
      • British English
      • Home Country:
      • UK
      • Current Location:
      • Japan
    Join Date
    Nov 2002
    Posts
    73,677

    Re: at a meeting vs in a meeting

    Fortunately, most spammers using spam software are using a cracked version and haven't read the f-manual. I did and it could be much scarier. If they bought it and understood it, there would be a lot more trouble than ones with the foresight to open a few accounts long before they bother us. And the returns must be diminishing on spam- I never see it in my email now, and we rarely see it here. They try, they die.

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •