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  1. #1
    Rachel Adams is offline Key Member
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    Thunders/headaches/rains

    These are my answers to the questions in my book "Reading Challenge" by Casey Malarcher and Andrea Janzen. I wanted to write different threads but the questions are connected. I was wondering if "thunders" is the correct choice of verb in #1, whether it should be "headache" "headaches" in #2 and "raining" instead of "rains" in #3.

    1. "What kind of weather do you like the most?"
    "I love rain when the thunderstorm thunders. I like sunny weather when it's light all around."

    2. "How does this weather make you feel?"

    "These changes in the weather can give me headaches." (a headache)


    3. "What do you like to do in this weather?"

    "I write poetry and try to write a book. When it is raining/when it rains I get inspired and can write chapter after chapter. The weather also has a mood."

    If the thread should be divided into different threads I will do so but as it's required to provide context I left my anwers as they are.

  2. #2
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    emsr2d2 is offline Moderator
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    Re: Thunders/headaches/rains

    Quote Originally Posted by Rachel Adams View Post
    These are my answers to the questions in my book "Reading Challenge" by Casey Malarcher and Andrea Janzen. I wanted to write different threads but the questions are connected. I was wondering if "thunders" is the correct choice of verb in #1, whether it should be "headache" or "headaches" in #2, and "raining" instead of "rains" in #3.

    1. "What kind of weather do you like the most?"
    "I love rainy when the thunderstorms. thunders. I like sunny weather." when it's light all around."

    2. "How does this weather make you feel?" You haven't specified which weather.
    "These changes in the weather can give me headaches." (a headache) This doesn't answer the question at all. You weren't asked how changes in weather make you feel.

    3. "What do you like to do in this weather?"

    "I like to write poetry and I'm trying to write a book. When it is raining/When it rains, I get inspired and can write chapter after chapter. The weather also has a mood." I don't know what the underlined part means.


    If the thread should be divided into different threads, I will do so but as it's I'm required to provide context, I have left my answers as they are.
    Note my corrections and comments above.

    Thunderstorms don't thunder. I suppose, technically, thunder thunders!
    Remember - if you don't use correct capitalisation, punctuation and spacing, anything you write will be incorrect.

  3. #3
    Rachel Adams is offline Key Member
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    Re: Thunders/headaches/rains

    Quote Originally Posted by emsr2d2 View Post
    Note my corrections and comments above.

    Thunderstorms don't thunder. I suppose, technically, thunder thunders!
    In #2 I mean that I don't feel well and I often have headaches. But should there be "headaches" or "a headache" These changes in the weather can give me headaches".
    By saying that it has a mood I mean it's like people. It changes like a mood. Are these parts still wrong?

  4. #4
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    emsr2d2 is offline Moderator
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    Re: Thunders/headaches/rains

    Quote Originally Posted by Rachel Adams View Post
    In #2 I mean that I don't feel well and I often have headaches. I know what you meant but I still don't know which type of weather you're talking about it. In the first question, you said that you like both rainy thunderstorms and sunny weather. Which one makes you feel ill?

    But Should there it be "headaches" or "a headache" in "These changes in the weather can give me headaches"?


    By saying that it has a mood I mean it's like people. It changes like a mood. Are these parts still wrong? Yes. It doesn't make sense. People aren't know particularly for changing their mood. Everyone knows the weather can change. I don't get the connection.
    Note my comments/questions in blue above.

    In answer to your main question, I would use "a headache" and say "Sudden changes in weather sometimes give me a headache". I'm sure you're not claiming that it being sunny on Monday and rainy on Tuesday would give you a headache.
    Remember - if you don't use correct capitalisation, punctuation and spacing, anything you write will be incorrect.

  5. #5
    Rachel Adams is offline Key Member
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    Re: Thunders/headaches/rains

    Quote Originally Posted by emsr2d2 View Post
    Note my comments/questions in blue above.

    In answer to your main question, I would use "a headache" and say "Sudden changes in weather sometimes give me a headache". I'm sure you're not claiming that it being sunny on Monday and rainy on Tuesday would give you a headache.
    These changes from sunny weather to rainy weather can give me headaches. That's what makes me ill. Unfortunately, it's very common where I live. Some people even get low blood pressure. That's why I said "these changes". I compared the local weather to people whose moods often change that's what I meant in "These changes in the weather can give me headaches." (a headache) perhaps "a headache" is also correct and "The weather also has a mood" too.

  6. #6
    Charlie Bernstein's Avatar
    Charlie Bernstein is offline VIP Member
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    Re: Thunders/headaches/rains

    Quote Originally Posted by Rachel Adams View Post
    These changes from sunny weather to rainy weather can give me headaches. That's what makes me ill. Unfortunately, it's very common where I live. Some people even get low blood pressure. That's why I said "these changes". I compared the local weather to people whose moods often change. That's what I meant by "These changes in the weather can give me headaches." (a headache) perhaps "a headache" is also correct and "The weather also has a mood," too.
    Singular isn't unnatural, but since you get more than one headache, plural is fine. They both make sense.

    And: Ow! Weather changes give me sinus headaches sometimes, too. Everyone else is talking about what a beautiful day it is, and I'm gobbling aspirin like popcorn.
    I'm not a teacher. I speak American English. I've tutored writing at the University of Southern Maine and have done a good deal of copy editing and writing, occasionally for publication.

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