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  1. Lenka's Avatar

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    #1

    eiher

    When do you use "either"?

    1) "She doesn't like me. And I don't like her either." <= does the sentence sound right?

    2) She doesn't seem sympathetic to me at all. In fact, I hate her. And I loathe her too/as well/either/???. <= which word (by the way, what part of speech are the words?) shall I use to make the sentence sound correct?

    Do you use "either" for expressing "also, too, as well..." in negative sentences? Is there a rule for using it?


    • Join Date: Jun 2006
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    #2

    Re: eiher

    either /aIDr% i:Dr/
    either

    1 CONJ



    You use either in front of the first of two or more alternatives, when you are stating the only possibilities or choices that there are. The other alternatives are introduced by `or'.
    Sightseeing is best done either by tour bus or by bicycles...
    The former President was demanding that he should be either put on trial or set free...
    Either she goes or I go.


    2 CONJ



    You use either in a negative statement in front of the first of two alternatives to indicate that the negative statement refers to both the alternatives.
    There had been no indication of either breathlessness or any loss of mental faculties right until his death.


    3 PRON



    You can use either to refer to one of two things, people, or situations, when you want to say that they are both possible and it does not matter which one is chosen or considered.
    There were glasses of champagne and cigars, but not many of either were consumed...


    QUANT QUANT of def-pl-n



    Either is also a quantifier.
    Do either of you smoke or drink heavily?


    DET DET sing-n



    Either is also a determiner.
    I don't particularly agree with either group.


    4 PRON with brd-neg



    You use either in a negative statement to refer to each of two things, people, or situations to indicate that the negative statement includes both of them.
    She warned me that I'd never marry or have children.`I don't want either.'


    QUANT



    Either is also a quantifier.
    There are no simple answers to either of those questions.


    DET



    Either is also a determiner.
    He sometimes couldn't remember either man's name.


    5 ADV ADV after v, with brd-neg



    You use either by itself in negative statements to indicate that there is a similarity or connection with a person or thing that you have just mentioned.
    He did not even say anything to her, and she did not speak to him either...


    6 ADV ADV after v



    When one negative statement follows another, you can use either at the end of the second one to indicate that you are adding an extra piece of information, and to emphasize that both are equally important.
    Don't agree, but don't argue either...


    7 DET DET sing-n



    You can use either to introduce a noun that refers to each of two things when you are talking about both of them.
    The basketball nets hung down from the ceiling at either end of the gymnasium...




    HarperCollins Publishers 2006

  2. MikeNewYork's Avatar
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    #3

    Re: eiher

    Quote Originally Posted by Lenka View Post
    When do you use "either"?

    1) "She doesn't like me. And I don't like her either." <= does the sentence sound right?

    2) She doesn't seem sympathetic to me at all. In fact, I hate her. And I loathe her too/as well/either/???. <= which word (by the way, what part of speech are the words?) shall I use to make the sentence sound correct?

    Do you use "either" for expressing "also, too, as well..." in negative sentences? Is there a rule for using it?
    The short answer is yes. You can use "either" (not also or too) after the second of two negative statements.

  3. Lenka's Avatar

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    #4

    Re: eiher

    Quote Originally Posted by MikeNewYork View Post
    The short answer is yes. You can use "either" (not also or too) after the second of two negative statements.
    Thanks...

    (I've just realized that my the second sentence I wrote in my question was quite meaningless... I wanted to get something completely different over. But that doesn't matter now, I think I can understand it.)

  4. MikeNewYork's Avatar
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    #5

    Re: eiher

    Quote Originally Posted by Lenka View Post
    Thanks...

    (I've just realized that my the second sentence I wrote in my question was quite meaningless... I wanted to get something completely different over. But that doesn't matter now, I think I can understand it.)
    Good. Yes, your second statement would be better with a different quality and structure. She is stupid. And, she's ugly as well.

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