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    • Join Date: Oct 2006
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    #1

    including me

    I know that it is correct to say "including me" rather than "including myself." I'd like to know how the word "me" functions in the sentence. (Everybody went to the park, including me.) Is it an indirect object?

    Also, I know that you say "I feel bad" vs. "I feel badly" because the word "feel" is a linking verb and you use an adjective to modify a linking verb. I also understand that the word "well" can be used as an adjective with verbs that denote a state of being or feeling. (I feel well.) My question is, when someone asks, "How are you?", I know it is proper to respond, "I am fine" or "I am doing well." However, if the verb "to be" is a linking verb, why can't you respond, "I am good" if adjectives are supposed to modify linking verbs? Is it due to the reason above (that the word "well" denotes a state of being or feeling?)? Is it absolutely incorrect to say "I am good"?

    Finally, is it acceptable to say both "I feel good" and "I feel well"?

  1. MikeNewYork's Avatar
    • Member Info
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    • Join Date: Nov 2002
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    #2

    Re: including me

    Quote Originally Posted by Robyn Talamo View Post
    I know that it is correct to say "including me" rather than "including myself." I'd like to know how the word "me" functions in the sentence. (Everybody went to the park, including me.) Is it an indirect object?

    Also, I know that you say "I feel bad" vs. "I feel badly" because the word "feel" is a linking verb and you use an adjective to modify a linking verb. I also understand that the word "well" can be used as an adjective with verbs that denote a state of being or feeling. (I feel well.) My question is, when someone asks, "How are you?", I know it is proper to respond, "I am fine" or "I am doing well." However, if the verb "to be" is a linking verb, why can't you respond, "I am good" if adjectives are supposed to modify linking verbs? Is it due to the reason above (that the word "well" denotes a state of being or feeling?)? Is it absolutely incorrect to say "I am good"?

    Finally, is it acceptable to say both "I feel good" and "I feel well"?
    In that sentence, "me" is the direct object of the participle "including".

    One can say "I am good", but it doesn't have the same meaning as "I am well". In that use, "well" is an adjective meaning healthy. Used correctly, I am good" would mean righteous, worthy of respect.

    In I feel good/well, "feel" is a linking verb. "Well" is an adjective meaning "healthy". "Good" refers to the person's general condition or spirits.


    • Join Date: Jul 2008
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    #3

    Re: including me

    Hi MikeNewyork,
    I would like to know What is wrong in using "myself" instead of "me".

    Please explain.


    Thank you.

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    #4

    Re: including me

    English is made up of thousands of fixed phrases: you either say 'including myself' or 'myself included'. All other alternatives are seldom heard.

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