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    • Join Date: Oct 2006
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    #1

    Smile seem and seem to be

    Hello.

    I am cunfused about the usage of the word "seem".
    In my english dictionary, I can find these two sentences.

    1. He seems to be ill.
    2. He seems young.

    Since both ill and young are adjectives, would it be alright if i said
    1. He seems ill. or 2. He seems to be young?

    Thank you very much for your time.

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    #2

    Re: seem and seem to be

    You could. Michael Swan suggests that seem + to be is more used for objective facts and seem + adjective more for subjective opinions.

  1. MikeNewYork's Avatar
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    #3

    Re: seem and seem to be

    Quote Originally Posted by Tdol View Post
    You could. Michael Swan suggests that seem + to be is more used for objective facts and seem + adjective more for subjective opinions.
    That's interesting, since "seem" is usually about perception.


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    #4

    Talking Re: seem and seem to be

    Thank you very much for answering my question.

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    #5

    Re: seem and seem to be

    Quote Originally Posted by MikeNewYork View Post
    That's interesting, since "seem" is usually about perception.
    He gives an example of something like 'the milk seems to be pasteurized', which does make sense to me.

  2. MikeNewYork's Avatar
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    #6

    Re: seem and seem to be

    Quote Originally Posted by Tdol View Post
    He gives an example of something like 'the milk seems to be pasteurized', which does make sense to me.
    OK, I accept that.

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    #7

    Re: seem and seem to be

    He is good at spotting things like that.

  3. MikeNewYork's Avatar
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    #8

    Re: seem and seem to be

    Quote Originally Posted by Tdol View Post
    He is good at spotting things like that.
    Yes, but I don't think it always works.

  4. #9

    Arrow Re: seem and seem to be

    Quote Originally Posted by lovelytofu View Post
    Hello.

    I am cunfused about the usage of the word "seem".
    In my english dictionary, I can find these two sentences.

    1. He seems to be ill.
    2. He seems young.

    Since both ill and young are adjectives, would it be alright if i said
    1. He seems ill. or 2. He seems to be young?

    Thank you very much for your time.

    i think in the first sentence. 1. He seems to be ill.
    it has also future meaning , in the meaning of "he will be ill i think" , prediction .
    and if you use "he seems ill" it is correct too and you are sure that he is ill.

  5. MikeNewYork's Avatar
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    #10

    Re: seem and seem to be

    Quote Originally Posted by trgalatasaray View Post
    i think in the first sentence. 1. He seems to be ill.
    it has also future meaning , in the meaning of "he will be ill i think" , prediction .
    and if you use "he seems ill" it is correct too and you are sure that he is ill.
    First, "seems to be ill" only has a present meaning. There is no prediction there.

    Second, the speaker is less than certain there, but he could be pretty sure.

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