Page 1 of 2 1 2 LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 13

    • Join Date: Oct 2006
    • Posts: 7
    #1

    Exclamation Adverbial Modifier

    How to recognize adverbial modifier?
    If I have sentence like this:-This transformed the sopping experience for millions of urban Americans.
    According to part of speech what function does have this-....for millions of urban American.?


    • Join Date: Oct 2006
    • Posts: 163
    #2

    Re: Adverbial Modifier

    paraphrased it might be easier for you:
    the shopping experience of millions of urban Americans was transformed by this.

  1. MikeNewYork's Avatar
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • American English
      • Home Country:
      • United States
      • Current Location:
      • United States

    • Join Date: Nov 2002
    • Posts: 24,983
    #3

    Re: Adverbial Modifier

    Quote Originally Posted by jass011 View Post
    How to recognize adverbial modifier?
    If I have sentence like this:-This transformed the sopping experience for millions of urban Americans.
    According to part of speech what function does have this-....for millions of urban American.?
    As written, I would call it an adverbial prepositional phrase.

    One test is to see if it can be moved.

    For millions of Americans, this transformed the shopping experience.

    If you change "for" to "of", it comes adjectival.

    Notice you can't move that one.

    "Of millions of Americans, this transformed..." doesn't work.


    • Join Date: May 2006
    • Posts: 1,335
    #4

    Re: Adverbial Modifier

    Hi, Jass,
    I think your question is fallacious. My understanding is that only separate words or some sets of words can be parts of speech – a noun, a verb, an interjection etc. I’d ask “What part of the sentence is this group of words?” My answer would be: for millions… is an indirect object.
    Cheers

  2. MikeNewYork's Avatar
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • American English
      • Home Country:
      • United States
      • Current Location:
      • United States

    • Join Date: Nov 2002
    • Posts: 24,983
    #5

    Re: Adverbial Modifier

    Quote Originally Posted by Humble View Post
    Hi, Jass,
    I think your question is fallacious. My understanding is that only separate words or some sets of words can be parts of speech – a noun, a verb, an interjection etc. I’d ask “What part of the sentence is this group of words?” My answer would be: for millions… is an indirect object.
    Cheers
    It's not an indirect object for me. That is a prepositional phrase.


    • Join Date: May 2006
    • Posts: 1,335
    #6

    Re: Adverbial Modifier

    Now I see our grammars are fundamentally different. No point debating. I won't, from now on.


    • Join Date: Oct 2006
    • Posts: 7
    #7

    Re: Adverbial Modifier

    I must tell you that both of you are right. It is indirect object but it is an prepositional phrase inside of the indirect object. At my university we do the sentence analisys like this:
    Sent-->S+P
    S-->NP(noun phrase)-->Pron.Dem.-->This
    P-->VP(verb phrase)
    VP-->Vtr.+D.O.+IO
    Vtr-->transformed
    D.O.-->NP
    NP-->Det.(determinator)+M+H
    Det.-->Art.def.-->the
    M-->N-->shooping
    H-->N-->experience
    I.O-->Prep.P


    etc.This is the way we do the syntactic analisys of the sentence.

  3. MikeNewYork's Avatar
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • American English
      • Home Country:
      • United States
      • Current Location:
      • United States

    • Join Date: Nov 2002
    • Posts: 24,983
    #8

    Re: Adverbial Modifier

    Quote Originally Posted by Humble View Post
    Now I see our grammars are fundamentally different. No point debating. I won't, from now on.
    It is not a huge difference, but it is an important one. Some grammars refer to the objects of "some" prepositional phrases as indirect objects. IMO, this veiwpoint stems from a mistaken attempt to liken our indirect objects to the Latinate "dative case". English has two distinct methods for indicating the same meaning.

    I threw John the ball.
    I threw the ball to John.

    The problem with having them both be indirect objects is that "to John" acts as an adverb, but "John" (in the first sentence) does not.

    In addition, many prepositional phrases have nothing to do with indirect objects.

    Mom walked me to school.
    We can't make that "Mom walked school me."


    • Join Date: Oct 2006
    • Posts: 7
    #9

    Re: Adverbial Modifier

    Hi Mike,
    I agree with you.You are totaly right but prepositional phrase can be inside of I.O.When I think better this-...for millions-couldn't be I.O. No way!

  4. MikeNewYork's Avatar
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • American English
      • Home Country:
      • United States
      • Current Location:
      • United States

    • Join Date: Nov 2002
    • Posts: 24,983
    #10

    Re: Adverbial Modifier

    Quote Originally Posted by jass011 View Post
    Hi Mike,
    I agree with you.You are totaly right but prepositional phrase can be inside of I.O.When I think better this-...for millions-couldn't be I.O. No way!
    It is all about definitions, lad.

Page 1 of 2 1 2 LastLast

Similar Threads

  1. What is noun modifier?
    By whitemoon in forum Ask a Teacher
    Replies: 4
    Last Post: 19-Apr-2010, 15:13
  2. adverbial clause of reason
    By Fame in forum Ask a Teacher
    Replies: 3
    Last Post: 30-Oct-2006, 04:30
  3. direct object or adverbial
    By hela in forum Ask a Teacher
    Replies: 5
    Last Post: 18-Oct-2005, 10:13
  4. Indirect object or Adverbial ?
    By hela in forum Ask a Teacher
    Replies: 10
    Last Post: 11-Oct-2005, 21:18
  5. Dangling modifier?
    By critic72 in forum Ask a Teacher
    Replies: 2
    Last Post: 17-Jun-2005, 04:31

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •