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    #1

    Thumbs up slipper as a verb?

    Hello everybody:
    I need your help !!! I have to translate a text about hyperactive children, and I found the following sentence really difficult due to the word slippered. The sentence is: Children were slippered on the backside...

    Is it right to use slipper as a verb that means hit with a slipper?

    Thanks in advance for any help.

  1. BobK's Avatar
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    #2

    Re: slipper as a verb?

    Almost any noun can be verbed - slipper certainly. My elder brother went to a school where people were slippered from time to time. (I didn't. At my school they caned people.)

    b

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    #3

    Re: slipper as a verb?

    It was the tawse for me! Ah the good old days

    But we didn't use 'tawsed', we were given 'the belt'
    Last edited by curmudgeon; 01-Nov-2006 at 04:25. Reason: spelling

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    #4

    Re: The tawse?

    It has nothing to do with the thread but may I ask what "the tawse" is and how you pronounce it?

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    #5

    Re: slipper as a verb?

    it's pronounced tauze as in gauze

    and here is a bit of info

    Tawse - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

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    #6

    Re: slipper as a verb?

    Quote Originally Posted by curmudgeon View Post
    It was the tawse for me! Ah the good old days
    But we didn't use 'tawsed', we were given 'the belt'
    Aye Curmudgeon, I got 'belted' every day from my maths teacher, and to such an extent that when I got my Highers, (also in maths), she presented it to me on my final day at school.
    "Here you are", she said, "it's touched your hands more than mine." ... class

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    #7

    Re: slipper as a verb?

    Quote Originally Posted by Hamburg View Post
    Aye Curmudgeon, I got 'belted' every day from my maths teacher, and to such an extent that when I got my Highers, (also in maths), she presented it to me on my final day at school.
    "Here you are", she said, "it's touched your hands more than mine." ... class
    Do you know they are now worth a lot of money? I hope you kept it

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    #8

    Re: slipper as a verb?

    here is a little story:

    When I was al lad of 13 at my senior secondary school ( where all the bright kids went - I suppose the equivalent of a grammar school in england) we were told in our first english class that if anyone (and there were 40 of us) failed to do their homework then everyone would be belted.

    I complied to this threat and dutifully done what was required. however there was always one who had not, for whatever reason, and excuses were a waste of time.

    Consequently by the end of term no one completed their homework, in fact we started each lesson with a beating.

    To this day i am still unsure what the sadistic bastard was trying to achieve.

    It did make me fairly fluent in the language! I would still like to meet him now!

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