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  1. Lenka's Avatar

    • Join Date: May 2004
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    #1

    kilts

    I have read an article about the Scottish kilts (by the way, should I use the definite article in the previous sentence?) and I don't understand something.

    The article says:
    "Gentlemen also wear kilts 'cos the birds luv it'. This is a strange old Scottish courting expression."

    Well, I assume that the bold text means "because the birds love it". I am just not that sure about the birds... Well, in Czech, it can have also a meaning of sth. different from the animal... I just wonder whether it has the same "second" meaning in English... I mean, does it stand for the .... "thing"?

    Anyway, it may have a totally different meaning... I don't know. Just tell me, please!

  2. Lenka's Avatar

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    #2

    Re: kilts

    The texts also reads:
    "After Bonnie Prince Charlie's defeat at Cullonden in 1746, the wearing of the kilt and the Gaelic language were banned. ..."

    I am not too good in History, so, could anyone try to explain it to me? Why was it banned?


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    #3

    Re: kilts

    Quote Originally Posted by Lenka View Post
    I have read an article about the Scottish kilts (by the way, should I use the definite article in the previous sentence?) and I don't understand something.

    The article says:
    "Gentlemen also wear kilts 'cos the birds luv it'. This is a strange old Scottish courting expression."

    Well, I assume that the bold text means "because the birds love it". I am just not that sure about the birds... Well, in Czech, it can have also a meaning of sth. different from the animal... I just wonder whether it has the same "second" meaning in English... I mean, does it stand for the .... "thing"?

    Anyway, it may have a totally different meaning... I don't know. Just tell me, please!

    "'cos the birds luv it" = the girls are attracted to men in kilts ( a very Scottish belief)

    As to your second question, the banning of kilts and Gaelic was an attempt to force the Highland Scots to speak English and accept English rule. Lowland Scots did not wear the kilt and plaid, and spoke Scots, an interesting form of English combined with elements from Scandinavia. The kilt became acceptable again when King George IV wore one on his first visit to Edinburgh at the beginning of the 19th century, and Scottish things became fashionable. NB: technically it is "the kilt", so either "the Scottish kilt" (specific) or "Scottish kilts" (general).

  3. BobK's Avatar
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    #4

    Re: kilts

    Quote Originally Posted by Anglika View Post
    "'cos the birds luv it" = the girls are attracted to men in kilts ( a very Scottish belief)...
    Yes, but not a very Scottish piece of slang. It's common (bird meaning young woman) as far south as London, maybe further.

    b

  4. Lenka's Avatar

    • Join Date: May 2004
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    #5

    Re: kilts

    Thank you for your replies!!

  5. MikeNewYork's Avatar
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    #6

    Re: kilts

    Quote Originally Posted by Lenka View Post
    I have read an article about the Scottish kilts (by the way, should I use the definite article in the previous sentence?) and I don't understand something.

    The article says:
    "Gentlemen also wear kilts 'cos the birds luv it'. This is a strange old Scottish courting expression."

    Well, I assume that the bold text means "because the birds love it". I am just not that sure about the birds... Well, in Czech, it can have also a meaning of sth. different from the animal... I just wonder whether it has the same "second" meaning in English... I mean, does it stand for the .... "thing"?

    Anyway, it may have a totally different meaning... I don't know. Just tell me, please!
    I your first sentence, I would use "about Scottish kilts" or "the Scottish kilt". Either form refers to "kilt" in general. If you use the definite article with kilts, the reference changes to specific kilts.

  6. Lenka's Avatar

    • Join Date: May 2004
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    #7

    Re: kilts

    Quote Originally Posted by MikeNewYork View Post
    I your first sentence, I would use "about Scottish kilts" or "the Scottish kilt". Either form refers to "kilt" in general. If you use the definite article with kilts, the reference changes to specific kilts.
    Thanks for your remark!

  7. curmudgeon's Avatar
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    #8

    Re: kilts

    Quote Originally Posted by Anglika View Post
    "'cos the birds luv it" = the girls are attracted to men in kilts ( a very Scottish belief)

    (general).

    Thats your opinion

  8. curmudgeon's Avatar
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    #9

    Re: kilts

    Quote Originally Posted by Anglika View Post
    "'cos the birds luv it" = the girls are attracted to men in kilts ( a very Scottish belief)

    (general).

    Thats your opinion. Your not a 'burd' by any chance? My experience of wearing a kilt is that it is like a candle to a moth

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    #10

    Re: kilts

    Quote Originally Posted by curmudgeon View Post
    Thats your opinion. Your not a 'burd' by any chance? My experience of wearing a kilt is that it is like a candle to a moth
    Mine too Curmudgeon ... mine too

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