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  1. #1

    an IMP switch

    Hi, could you help me?
    This is from a book called "The Biology of Belief" by Bruce Lipton.

    I subsequently learned that the body's system-wide emergency response signal, adrenaline, also has switches sporting two different adrenaline-sensing receptors, called alpha and beta. The adrenaline receptors provoked the exact same cell behaviors as those elicited by histamine. When the adrenal alpha-receptor is part of [COLOR="Magenta"]an IMP switch[/COLOR], it provokes a protection response when adrenaline is perceived. When the beta-receptor is part of the switch, the same adrenaline signal activates a growth response. [Lipton, et al, 1992]

    Q1: It seems "Adrenal alpha-receptor" is not frequently used in English. Since "Adrenal" usually means "of the adrenal gland", does it mean "alpha-receptor of the adrenal gland"? Or, was it written in mistake for "adrenaline"?

    Q2: Does "IMP" mean "inosine monophosphate" in this case?

    Thank you for your help!
    Last edited by pink dragon; 05-Nov-2006 at 10:40.

  2. #2

    Re: an IMP switch

    Generally speaking, it's kinda hard to get good, or at least reliable answers here (an English Language board) for words belonging to such a specific semantic field.

    Perhaps you could also try to find a board relevant to the subject. Alternatively, check this website: Acronym and abbreviation dictionary: Find out what over 3,019,000 abbreviations, acronyms, and initialisms stand for

    According to them, IMP (in science and biology) is " Inosine 5'-Monophosphate"

  3. #3

    Re: an IMP switch

    Thank you very much, Mariner!

    As you say, it's the best if I could find a board relevant to the subject, and I actually have been trying to find one for a long time. But I haven't been able to find one .
    I have also been trying to make friends with native speakers in the medical field for years, but I haven't been succeeded. Teachers with medical knowledge are outrageously expensive and I can't afford it.

    So I'll wait for a reply about my Q1, as long as there is a possiblity that someone with some knowledge about the subject may see my posting.
    That's the only thing I can do for now.

  4. curmudgeon's Avatar
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    #4

    Re: an IMP switch

    might mean adreno receptors

    try here

    Adrenoceptor

  5. MikeNewYork's Avatar
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    #5

    Re: an IMP switch

    Quote Originally Posted by pink dragon View Post
    Hi, could you help me?
    This is from a book called "The Biology of Belief" by Bruce Lipton.

    I subsequently learned that the body's system-wide emergency response signal, adrenaline, also has switches sporting two different adrenaline-sensing receptors, called alpha and beta. The adrenaline receptors provoked the exact same cell behaviors as those elicited by histamine. When the adrenal alpha-receptor is part of [color="Magenta"]an IMP switch[/COLOR], it provokes a protection response when adrenaline is perceived. When the beta-receptor is part of the switch, the same adrenaline signal activates a growth response. [Lipton, et al, 1992]

    Q1: It seems "Adrenal alpha-receptor" is not frequently used in English. Since "Adrenal" usually means "of the adrenal gland", does it mean "alpha-receptor of the adrenal gland"? Or, was it written in mistake for "adrenaline"?

    Q2: Does "IMP" mean "inosine monophosphate" in this case?

    Thank you for your help!
    1. The receptors are usually called "alpha-adrenergic receptors" and "beta-adrenergic receptors". These receptors are found in other organs and they are triggered by hormones made in the adrenal gland.

    2. Yes. When the hormone attaches to the receptor, the switch is turned on.

  6. #6

    Re: an IMP switch

    Thank you, curmudgeon! That's helpful.

    (By the way, you are so kind, not a curmudgeon at all... )

    PD

  7. curmudgeon's Avatar
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    #7

    Re: an IMP switch

    Aw, shucks

  8. #8

    Re: an IMP switch

    Thank you, MikeNewYork!!!!!!!!!!

    It makes excellent sense.

    Thank you again!

  9. MikeNewYork's Avatar
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    #9

    Re: an IMP switch

    Quote Originally Posted by pink dragon View Post
    Thank you, MikeNewYork!!!!!!!!!!

    It makes excellent sense.

    Thank you again!
    You're very welcome.

  10. #10

    Re: an IMP switch

    After further search, I think "IMP" may be "integral membrane protein"...

    Sorry to bother you all!

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