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  1. #1

    "come into play", "come in to play"

    Hi, please tell me...
    Is it correct to write "come in to play"?
    This sentence is from a book "The biology of Belief" by Bruce Lipton.

    "This is where the politics of the community described earlier comes in to play."

    I can find the idiom "come into play" in dictionaries, but do you also use "come in to play", separating "in" and "to"?


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    #2

    Re: "come into play", "come in to play"

    Either could be correct within a context, but generally "into" would be the norm for this one, and if proofreading this text, I would have changed it accordingly.

  2. #3

    Re: "come into play", "come in to play"

    Thank you very much, Anglika!

    So, do "come into play" and "come in to play" always mean the exactly same thing and in this sentence, too? Just a preference of the writer?

    PD

  3. curmudgeon's Avatar
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    #4

    Re: "come into play", "come in to play"

    I think comes into is better.
    Comes into play/sight/view etc
    comes in to play has in my opinion a different meaning.

    comes in to play/eat/change clothes/

    I think the author (or the publisher) has got it wrong

  4. BobK's Avatar
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    #5

    Re: "come into play", "come in to play"

    Quote Originally Posted by pink dragon View Post
    Thank you very much, Anglika!
    So, do "come into play" and "come in to play" always mean the exactly same thing and in this sentence, too? Just a preference of the writer?
    PD
    No they don't PD: it's into here, as others have said.

    Here's an example of the two word usage:

    It started raining, so they came in to play.

    Here, the words came in go together, and the words to play go together; so, although similar sounds happen to fall together, the word-breaks are different.

    b

  5. #6

    Re: "come into play", "come in to play"

    I see. Thank you so mush, curmudgeon and BobK!

    And...
    "Play" in "come into play" is a noun, and "play" in "come in to play" is a verb.
    Is that correct?

    PD

  6. BobK's Avatar
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    #7

    Re: "come into play", "come in to play"



    b

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