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    #1

    Question as...as

    John is 15 years old. Jack is 15 years old.
    John is as old as Jack is.
    When do we say John is as young as Jack is.

  1. #2

    Re: as...as

    Young and old are antonyms, which means that the one is the opposite of the other (just like tall-short, fast-slow, etc)

    Now, in these kinds of antonyms, we call one of them "marked" and the other "unmarked". In simple terms, this means that the one is neutral (the unmarked), while the other implies something (the marked)

    In our examples, "old" is the unmarked and "young" the marked. Which means that when you say "John is as old as Jack", there is nothing special implied about it. But when you say "John is as young as Jack", the sentence implies that, for example, you expected John to be older than Jack, but he actually isn't. This is shown more clearly with sentences like these:

    "How old are your parents?" (nothing implied; neutral sentence)

    "How young are your parents?" (it implies that his/her parents look quite young)

  2. Harry Smith's Avatar
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    #3

    Re: as...as

    Quote Originally Posted by daisy1352 View Post
    John is 15 years old. Jack is 15 years old.
    John is as old as Jack is.
    When do we say John is as young as Jack is.
    When you say "John is as old as Jack" you mean that they are the same age. But when you say "John is as young as Jack" we mean John looks young.

  3. #4

    Re: as...as

    In a sense, yeah. It is implied in a subconscious way.

    EDIT:
    Or, alternatively, it indicates that he is "young enough for something"
    E.g.
    -Jack can go to the playground. Can John go?
    -Yeah, he is as young as Jack

    Meaning, he is young enough for the playground
    Last edited by Mariner; 06-Nov-2006 at 06:06.

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    #5

    Re: as...as

    Yes; I'd agree with Mariner that "as old as", on the whole, relates to the number of years; whereas "as young as", on the whole, draws attention to "young-ness", as in these examples from Google:

    1. You're as young as you feel.

    2. Your website is beautiful and your writing is astounding for someone as young as you are.

    3. If I were as young as you are, I would be sitting where you are now and saying what you are saying.

    MrP

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