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  1. kindaichi's Avatar

    • Join Date: Aug 2006
    • Posts: 17
    #1

    Why "had"?

    Please take a look at these sentences.

    1.I thought I had renewed my subscription to the National Geographic magazine, but they informed me that I hadn't

    2.However, modern scholars such as Vincent Cronin and Simone Bertiere have proven that Louis XVI never had the surgery, since it is not recorded in his medical records

    Why both sentences have "had" in it?Can someone explain?Thanks

  2. BobK's Avatar
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      • English
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      • UK
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    • Join Date: Jul 2006
    • Posts: 16,038
    #2

    Re: Why "had"?

    1 - had is an auxiliary verb, used to form the past perfect. It's not easy to see that it's an auxiliary, because the participle that goes with it has been dropped: 'I hadn't [renewed it]'.

    2 - had is the simple past of the verb 'have' in the sense of undergo in the phrase 'to have surgery'.

    b

  3. kindaichi's Avatar

    • Join Date: Aug 2006
    • Posts: 17
    #3

    Re: Why "had"?

    I am sorry but i still dont understand.I have difficulty understanding the usage of "had".

  4. MikeNewYork's Avatar
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      • American English
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      • United States
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      • United States

    • Join Date: Nov 2002
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    #4

    Re: Why "had"?

    Quote Originally Posted by kindaichi View Post
    Please take a look at these sentences.

    1.I thought I had renewed my subscription to the National Geographic magazine, but they informed me that I hadn't

    2.However, modern scholars such as Vincent Cronin and Simone Bertiere have proven that Louis XVI never had the surgery, since it is not recorded in his medical records

    Why both sentences have "had" in it?Can someone explain?Thanks
    There are two uses for the verb "have". One use is as an auxiliary verb. A form of "have" + a past participle form the perfect tenses:

    I have seen... (present perfect)
    She has seen... (present perfect)
    I had seen... (past perfect)

    In your first sentence, both uses of "had" are part of past perfect verbs: I had renewed...and I hadn't (renewed).

    The past perfect is used to indicate which of two past events occurred first. In this case, the person had a thought (in the past) about an action that occurred earlier in time (renewal).

    In your second sentence, the first "have" is an auxiliary to make the present perfect -- have proven. The second "had" is not an auxiliary; it is a main verb meaning "was subjected to".

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