Page 1 of 2 1 2 LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 12

    • Join Date: Nov 2005
    • Posts: 109
    #1

    The Buccaneers

    Greetings all.

    I read this passage talking about Edith Warton's The Buccaneers in Wilipedia, but didn't quite understand its meaning:
    "The story revolves around five wealthy and ambitious American girls and their guardians. They participate in the London Season in search of a titled English gentleman for matrimonial purposes, and of the titled, land-rich but cash-poor Englishmen who marry them."

    I wondered whether the sentense without omission should have been "They participate in the London Season in search of a titled English gentleman for matrimonial purposes, and in serch of the titled, land-rich but cash-poor Englishmen who marry them" ?

    If so, was it redundance? Why did't they just say "They were in search of titled, land-rich but cash-poor Englishmen who would marry them"?

    Thanks in advance.
    Last edited by MadHorse; 12-Nov-2006 at 08:08.

  1. MikeNewYork's Avatar
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • American English
      • Home Country:
      • United States
      • Current Location:
      • United States

    • Join Date: Nov 2002
    • Posts: 24,983
    #2

    Re: The Buccaneers

    Quote Originally Posted by MadHorse View Post
    Greetings all.

    I read this passage talking about Edith Warton's The Buccaneers in Wilipedia, but didn't quite understand its meaning:
    "The story revolves around five wealthy and ambitious American girls and their guardians. They participate in the London Season in search of a titled English gentleman for matrimonial purposes, and of the titled, land-rich but cash-poor Englishmen who marry them."

    I wondered whether the sentense without omission should have been "They participate in the London Season in search of a titled English gentleman for matrimonial purposes, and in serch of the titled, land-rich but cash-poor Englishmen who marry them" ?

    If so, was it redundance? Why did't they just say "They were in search of titled, land-rich but cash-poor Englishmen who would marry them"?

    Thanks in advance.
    I doubt that they were searching for "cash-poor" gentlemen. The Wikipedia sentence is badly written. I don't know the book, but it is likely that the women were looking for rich, titled gentlemen. Perhaps they ended up with land-rich, cash-poor, titled gentlemen instead.


    • Join Date: Nov 2005
    • Posts: 109
    #3

    Re: The Buccaneers

    Quote Originally Posted by MikeNewYork View Post
    I doubt that they were searching for "cash-poor" gentlemen. The Wikipedia sentence is badly written. I don't know the book, but it is likely that the women were looking for rich, titled gentlemen. Perhaps they ended up with land-rich, cash-poor, titled gentlemen instead.
    Thanks Mike. I haven't read the book, but I thought it was possible the weathy girls with less distinctive social status would seek titled gentlemen without money as they both have something lacking and desired. Thanks for letting me know it's badly written.
    Last edited by MadHorse; 12-Nov-2006 at 18:18.

  2. Ouisch's Avatar
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • English
      • Home Country:
      • United States
      • Current Location:
      • United States

    • Join Date: Mar 2006
    • Posts: 4,142
    #4

    Re: The Buccaneers

    It's hard to decipher from that Wiki quote, but what they meant to say was that the American women were looking for wealthy, titled Englishmen to marry, and they ended up with cash-poor but titled English land owners who were looking for wealthy women so that they could use their money to rebuild their crumbling estates.


    • Join Date: Nov 2005
    • Posts: 109
    #5

    Re: The Buccaneers

    Quisch,

    On a second thought, I will have to agree with you and Mike. Thanks.

  3. MikeNewYork's Avatar
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • American English
      • Home Country:
      • United States
      • Current Location:
      • United States

    • Join Date: Nov 2002
    • Posts: 24,983
    #6

    Re: The Buccaneers

    Quote Originally Posted by MadHorse View Post
    Quisch,

    On a second thought, I will have to agree with you and Mike. Thanks.
    You just have to understand women.

    BTW, that should be "on second thought".

  4. Ouisch's Avatar
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • English
      • Home Country:
      • United States
      • Current Location:
      • United States

    • Join Date: Mar 2006
    • Posts: 4,142
    #7

    Re: The Buccaneers

    Quote Originally Posted by MikeNewYork View Post
    You just have to understand women.
    You mean those wacky money-grubbin' women who refuse to bathe?

  5. MikeNewYork's Avatar
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • American English
      • Home Country:
      • United States
      • Current Location:
      • United States

    • Join Date: Nov 2002
    • Posts: 24,983
    #8

    Re: The Buccaneers

    Quote Originally Posted by Ouisch View Post
    You mean those wacky money-grubbin' women who refuse to bathe?
    Those would be they.


    • Join Date: Nov 2005
    • Posts: 109
    #9

    Re: The Buccaneers

    Quote Originally Posted by MikeNewYork View Post
    You just have to understand women. ".
    Oh I understand them pretty well, Mike, being one of them all my life.


    BTW, I also read a reviewer of 'The Buccaneers' miniseries says:
    ''I paid almost 40 buckaroos for this PBS/BBC collaboration...and it was worth every red cent."
    Dictionary.com does not list 'buck' as one of buckaroo's definitions. Do you see this use often?

  6. MikeNewYork's Avatar
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • American English
      • Home Country:
      • United States
      • Current Location:
      • United States

    • Join Date: Nov 2002
    • Posts: 24,983
    #10

    Re: The Buccaneers

    Quote Originally Posted by MadHorse View Post
    Oh I understand them pretty well, Mike, being one of them all my life.


    BTW, I also read a reviewer of 'The Buccaneers' miniseries says:
    ''I paid almost 40 buckaroos for this PBS/BBC collaboration...and it was worth every red cent."
    Dictionary.com does not list 'buck' as one of buckaroo's definitions. Do you see this use often?
    Oops!

    No, that would be a humorous description of a dollar.

Page 1 of 2 1 2 LastLast

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •