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  1. ore
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    #1

    catalogue essa

    1.What does "catalogue essay" mean?
    (context: The book includes Sylvester's catalogue essay, as well as an interview, for an exhibition he curated of the film designs of his school friend Ken Adam, creator of Dr Strangelove's war room and of James Bond sets.)

    2. He is unreligious, then why is "Old Testament wrath" used here? Is "Old Testament wrath" a metaphor or other kind of figure of speech?
    (context: Sylvester, the descendant of rabbis, was unreligious, reserving his awe for art and his Old Testament wrath for anyone who transgressed it.)

  2. Mister Micawber's Avatar
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    #2

    Re: catalogue essa

    .
    1-- It is just an essay serving as part (probably the Introduction) of the catalogue for the mentioned art exhibition-- such a catalogue usually holds colour prints of the artworks, and descriptive and ancillary information about the art and its artist.

    2-- I would think it is just an unfortunate choice of set phrase-- or perhaps his rabbinical ancestors are sufficient to instill him with a touch of the Old Testament.
    .

  3. MikeNewYork's Avatar
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    #3

    Re: catalogue essa

    Quote Originally Posted by ore View Post
    1.What does "catalogue essay" mean?
    (context: The book includes Sylvester's catalogue essay, as well as an interview, for an exhibition he curated of the film designs of his school friend Ken Adam, creator of Dr Strangelove's war room and of James Bond sets.)

    2. He is unreligious, then why is "Old Testament wrath" used here? Is "Old Testament wrath" a metaphor or other kind of figure of speech?
    (context: Sylvester, the descendant of rabbis, was unreligious, reserving his awe for art and his Old Testament wrath for anyone who transgressed it.)
    IMO opinion, this means that Sylvester doesn't care much about religion. In the Bible, "awe" would be used primarily in reference to God's power and works and Old Testament wrath was reserved for sinners against God's laws. Sylvester only respected "art", so his "awe" was reserved for art and his wrath only showed up when someone trangressed his art.

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