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    • Join Date: Jul 2005
    • Posts: 928
    #1

    correct?

    Hi,

    in the following sentence:

    General examples of grounds for notice include the failure to perform the work duties of which the employee has already been notified.

    How do I make clear that the second part of the sentence starting with "of which" refers to "the failure" and not to the "work duties"? I could use a comma, but as it is an identifying clause ("the failure of which he has been notified"), it wouldn´t be correct.

    Thank you very much.

    Hanka


    • Join Date: Aug 2006
    • Posts: 3,059
    #2

    Re: correct?

    Quote Originally Posted by Hanka View Post
    Hi,
    in the following sentence:
    General examples of grounds for notice include the failure to perform the work duties of which the employee has already been notified.

    How do I make clear that the second part of the sentence starting with "of which" refers to "the failure" and not to the "work duties"? I could use a comma, but as it is an identifying clause ("the failure of which he has been notified"), it wouldn´t be correct.
    Thank you very much.
    Hanka
    I'm not completely sure I follow you here, Hanka. Here's one idea but if that's not what you want try to write out your meaning without relative clauses and then maybe we can see your true meaning.

    One example of grounds for notice include the failure to perform the work duties, a listing of which employees have already received.


    • Join Date: Oct 2006
    • Posts: 19,434
    #3

    Re: correct?

    Quote Originally Posted by Hanka View Post
    Hi,

    in the following sentence:

    General examples of grounds for notice include the failure to perform the work duties of which the employee has already been notified.

    How do I make clear that the second part of the sentence starting with "of which" refers to "the failure" and not to the "work duties"? I could use a comma, but as it is an identifying clause ("the failure of which he has been notified"), it wouldn´t be correct.

    Thank you very much.

    Hanka

    I would phrase this:

    General examples of grounds for notice include the failure to perform work duties; the employee will already have received a warning about this failure.

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