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    • Join Date: Nov 2006
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    #1

    Smile Doubt about tense

    I would like to understand why the verb take was used in the simple present in the sentence: I canīt wait to see where this journey takes me.

    What does the use of takes imply in this sentence?

    Thanks!

  1. RonBee's Avatar
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    #2

    Re: Doubt about tense

    Quote Originally Posted by dinha View Post
    I would like to understand why the verb take was used in the simple present in the sentence: I canīt wait to see where this journey takes me.
    The sentence "I can't wait to see where this journey takes me" indicates that the speaker is eager to see what will happen on the journey. He expects it to be an interesting one.

    What would you use instead of takes there?

    (I have often seen doubt used here instead of question, but a doubt is not a question.)



    • Join Date: Nov 2006
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    #3

    Re: Doubt about tense

    Thank you for your help Ronbee !!!!


    • Join Date: Mar 2006
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    #4

    Re: Doubt about tense

    Quote Originally Posted by RonBee View Post
    What would you use instead of takes there?
    Will take? The journey has not happened yet, after all.

    I think it's a tough question. My opinion is that it depends upon whether the clause is independent or not

    1. "I can't wait to see <independent object clause>.
    2. "I can't wait to see where/what/who <dependent object clause>

    Compare Old English:

    a) I know not if fortune shall make me a beggar or a prince.
    b) I know not where I'm bound.

    In 1), nothing after the primary clause is related to the object clause, so it must stand alone, and takes its tense accordingly: "where this journey WILL take me..."

    In 2), the object clause is dependent on the primary clause, and takes its tense from that clause.

  2. curmudgeon's Avatar
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    #5

    Re: Doubt about tense

    Quote Originally Posted by RonBee View Post

    (I have often seen doubt used here instead of question, but a doubt is not a question.)

    But a doubt can lead to a question


    • Join Date: May 2006
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    #6

    Re: Doubt about tense

    Hi,
    Still I can’t understand why will take me is impossible. I can only humbly put up with it – OK, they say so in Britain, learn it, no questions asked.

  3. Johnny's Avatar

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    #7

    Re: Doubt about tense

    Quote Originally Posted by Humble View Post
    Hi,
    – OK, they say so in Britain, learn it, no questions asked.
    I can't agree with you more, sometimes it's a little bit complicated to raise so many questions to study the structures. Language itself is something mysterious.

    IMHO: speak English as what the native speakers do and mistake like what they make(As few as possible)

    ohhh

  4. curmudgeon's Avatar
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    #8

    Re: Doubt about tense

    Quote Originally Posted by RonBee View Post

    What would you use instead of takes there?



    'leads' ?

  5. MikeNewYork's Avatar
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    #9

    Re: Doubt about tense

    Quote Originally Posted by Humble View Post
    Hi,
    Still I can’t understand why will take me is impossible. I can only humbly put up with it – OK, they say so in Britain, learn it, no questions asked.
    Your sentence is fine with either "takes me" or "will take me".

  6. rewboss's Avatar

    • Join Date: Feb 2006
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    #10

    Re: Doubt about tense

    Yep. "Will" here is perfectly acceptable.

    "Will" indicates a prediction. On the other hand, the simple present tense, when referring to a future event, indicates that the future event is certain, but that no special planning on the part of either the speaker or the subject was necessary. Both are possible here, but "will" allows for the possibility that the end of the journey may not actually be reached.

    English doesn't have a proper future tense; instead, it uses a system of modal verbs and aspects in the present tense:

    simple present -- the event is definite, and neither the speaker nor the subject have made any special arrangements to make it happen: The train arrives at 2.30 tomorrow; The shops are closed next Wednesday.

    present progressive -- the event is definite, all the arrangements have been made: We are flying to Corfu next summer.

    going to -- the decision has been made, but so far no arrangements have been made, or special arrangements are unnecessary: I am going to phone her tomorrow. This construction can also be used for events that are about to happen very, very soon: He's standing too close to the edge -- he's going to fall.

    will/may/might -- The speaker is making a prediction. "Will" means the speaker is certain, "may" or "might" means there is some doubt: It will rain tomorrow (I am sure of it); I may buy a new car tomorrow (but I may not).

    will -- The speaker is making a decision at the moment of speaking: I've just remembered -- it's Harry's birthday today! I'll phone him.

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