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  1. #1

    Talking shaking the trees.

    I don't know if my last question sent on 18th on the same idioms reached you, but I didn'd find it today on "My Posts" that's why I'm repeating it:
    What is the meaning of the following idioms, please explain with some usages: (1) shaking the trees, (2) pulsing the society, (3) hair on fire, (4) silver bullet. Please ignore if you have already posted. thanks.

  2. curmudgeon's Avatar
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    #2

    Re: shaking the trees.

    Hi, I sent this reply, I don't know why you didn't see it but here it is again;

    1. 'Shaking the trees' means taking action that makes something happen'

    2. 'Pulsing the system' I am unsure. Maybe, similar to 'testing the water' which is to have a quick look to get the feel of someone or something before going ahead and plunging in. It could also mean breathing life into something, perhaps acting in a way which stimulates.

    3. 'Hair on fire' describes frenetic activity. 'As the deadline approached, the project team were running around as if their hair was on fire.'

    4. 'Silver bullet' is used to describe something which provides the answer to a problem at one stroke. 'The new method was the silver bullet that solved the production problem.'


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    #3

    Re: shaking the trees.

    Quote Originally Posted by curmudgeon View Post
    Hi, I sent this reply, I don't know why you didn't see it but here it is again;
    1. 'Shaking the trees' means taking action that makes something happen'
    2. 'Pulsing the system' I am unsure. Maybe, similar to 'testing the water' which is to have a quick look to get the feel of someone or something before going ahead and plunging in. It could also mean breathing life into something, perhaps acting in a way which stimulates.
    3. 'Hair on fire' describes frenetic activity. 'As the deadline approached, the project team were running around as if their hair was on fire.'
    4. 'Silver bullet' is used to describe something which provides the answer to a problem at one stroke. 'The new method was the silver bullet that solved the production problem.'
    I think maybe 'pulsing the society' is a misstatement of 'taking the pulse of...' - gathering information that provides an overview of the mood of society (or some other group). The idiom here comes from the medical practice of taking a patient's pulse in order to gain an insight into their general health.

    It may be worth pointing out that the idiom 'silver bullet' is a reference to werewolf legend. A silver bullet is the only method to kill a werewolf, according to legend. The idiom in English came to mean a solution to a difficult problem.

  3. curmudgeon's Avatar
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    #4

    Re: shaking the trees.

    Quite right Coffa, I do believe that your point was made in the original thread. Beats me where it went, but it is not the first thread to go astray

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