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    #1

    Red face "Overdo"

    Dear All,

    1) There is an English learning corner on a newspaper saying that "overdo salt" means putting too much salt while cooking.
    • How can I make a sentence with "overdo salt" of the said meaning?

    2) "She really overdid the sympathy, she did not seem sincere."
    "You just recovered from the flu, so please do not overdo things"
    "She always overdoes things"
    • Are they proper English? How can I make them better?

    3) Can I use "overdo" on saying someone has been very strict on parenting / working / playing / eating? Kindly explain with examples.


    Many thanks / ju

  1. Ouisch's Avatar
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    #2

    Re: "Overdo"

    Quote Originally Posted by judyleonghk View Post
    Dear All,

    1) There is an English learning corner on a newspaper saying that "overdo salt" means putting too much salt while cooking.
    • How can I make a sentence with "overdo salt" of the said meaning?
    A doctor might say, "Your blood pressure is too high, try not to overdo the salt." (meaning don't add extra salt on your food)


    2) "She really overdid the sympathy, she did not seem sincere."
    "You just recovered from the flu, so please do not overdo things"
    "She always overdoes things"
    • Are they proper English? How can I make them better?
    These examples are fine. For the second sentence, though, it would probably be better to simply say: "You just recovered from the flu, so please don't overdo." ("things" is implied)


    3) Can I use "overdo" on saying someone has been very strict on parenting / working / playing / eating? Kindly explain with examples.
    Yes.
    "Every year before Thanksgiving I tell myself I'll have just a little bit of stuffing and only one piece of pie....but once I'm at the table I always end up overdoing it."

    "My sister spanks her son for the least little thing. I believe in discipline, but I think she's really overdoing it."

    Employee to boss: "You really look good today, Mr. Jones. I love that suit! Have you been working out? You look like you've lost weight..."
    Boss to employee: "I'm already considering you for a promotion, there's no need to overdo it."

  2. BobK's Avatar
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    #3

    Re: "Overdo"

    Quote Originally Posted by Ouisch View Post
    ... For the second sentence, though, it would probably be better to simply say: "You just recovered from the flu, so please don't overdo." ("things" is implied)
    ...
    Not in BE; we would normally say 'don't overdo it' in this context; 'don't overdo things' would be OK, though I suspect it'd be slightly less common. I don't think a native BE speaker would say 'don't overdo'.

    Generally, I get the impression that AmE is readier to assume an obvious object than we are; they will say 'She's trying to reduce' (at least, I think that's AmE - unless Ray Charles, in Two-Ton Tessie from Tennessee, just wanted a rhyme for excuse), where a BE speaker would say 'she's trying to lose weight' or 'she's slimming'.

    b

  3. Ouisch's Avatar
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    #4

    Re: "Overdo"

    Quote Originally Posted by BobK View Post
    Not in BE; we would normally say 'don't overdo it' in this context; 'don't overdo things' would be OK, though I suspect it'd be slightly less common. I don't think a native BE speaker would say 'don't overdo'.

    Generally, I get the impression that AmE is readier to assume an obvious object than we are; they will say 'She's trying to reduce' (at least, I think that's AmE - unless Ray Charles, in Two-Ton Tessie from Tennessee, just wanted a rhyme for excuse), where a BE speaker would say 'she's trying to lose weight' or 'she's slimming'.

    b
    "Reduce" was used in reference to losing weight back in the 1940s and 50s - they used to advertise and sell "reducing pills" and "reducing machines" quite regularly - but that phraseology has gone the way of "groovy." We now just say "lose weight" ("slimming" is strictly BE).

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