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  1. Lenka's Avatar

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    #1

    in / at the end

    Let's suppose I am going to present a presentation of some kind. Shall I use "at" or "in" the end?

    e.g.:

    At first, I'd like to talk about this and that...
    Secondly, I'd like to mention some....
    And at/in (??) the end, I'll try to sum it all up and try to think out some possible ways how to solve this situation...

    Is it correct (I mean everything I've just written)? Could you correct the mistakes I've made, please?

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    #2

    Re: in / at the end

    Hello Lenka

    If you're explaining the main points, at the beginning of your presentation, you could use the following expressions:

    "First of all, I'll be talking about [this, that and the other]."

    "Then I'll be going on to discuss [XYZ]."

    "In conclusion, I'll be presenting some possible solutions to the problem."

    Of course, there are other ways to say the same thing – perhaps other members will have better ideas!

    All the best,

    MrP

  2. #3

    Re: in / at the end

    So, what's the difference between in/at?

  3. BobK's Avatar
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    #4

    Re: in / at the end

    Quote Originally Posted by Belly T View Post
    So, what's the difference between in/at?
    In Humble's case, it should be 'at' (though I prefer MrP's version). The meanings of 'in the end' and 'at the end' are not that close. 'At the end' means 'at the final stage/lastly' and 'in the end' has only a tangential reference to time - it refers to the end of a process:

    At the end I had planned to produce a rabbit out of a hat, but in the end I just bowed and left the stage.

    'In the end' also sometimes refers to a consequence or logical conclusion:

    In the end, you're only fooling yourself.

    Sometimes she Yes, sometimes No, but in the end she means the same thing.


    b

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    #5

    Re: in / at the end

    Quote Originally Posted by Belly T View Post
    So, what's the difference between in/at?
    See also my answer to the question at/in in this forum

  4. Lenka's Avatar

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    #6

    Re: in / at the end

    Thank you for your suggestions, MrPedantic. I am sure I will need these "phrases" and I should acquire using them in speech.

    But, what about the one I wrote? Could you correct them, please? Or are they all completely incorrect?? I hope they are not.. (By the way, if I now wanted to say "I hope they are", I might (is it correct?) say "I hope so". What do I say if I want to express something like "I hope they are not.."? I don't hope so?? How?)

    Quote Originally Posted by Lenka View Post
    At first, I'd like to talk about this and that...
    Secondly, I'd like to mention some....
    And at/in (??) the end (which one is correct here?), I'll try to sum it all up and try to think out some possible ways how to solve this situation...

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    #7

    Re: in / at the end

    Hello Lenka

    Phrase B is fine. Here are the corrected versions of A and C:

    a) First (of all), I'd like to talk about...
    c) Finally, I'll try to sum it all up and try to think up some possible ways of solving the problem.

    You might hear A during a presentation. B would be less usual; though you might hear it in e.g. a "thank you" speech. C would give a rather "vague" impression.

    As for "I hope not", yes, you can use it as a negative version of "I hope so", e.g.

    1. "Excuse me, is this the train to Edinburgh?" "I hope so!"

    2. "I hope Zéphirine will be all right, travelling to Manchester on her own." "I hope so too."

    3. "Did you hear that noise downstairs? It sounded like the back window. Do you think someone's trying to break in?" "I hope not." "Well, hadn't you better go down and check?"

    4. <driiiing driiiing> <driiiing driiiing> "That'll be Josie." "Oh God, I hope not."

    Have a good Wednesday,

    MrP

  5. Lenka's Avatar

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    #8

    Re: in / at the end

    Thank you, MrPedantic! Have a nice day too!

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