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    #1

    in or along

    Dear teachers,

    Please read the following sentence:

    I think we should try to bring him ALONG. He is quite an expert on this subject.

    My question is: can I replace 'along' with 'in'? In my dictionary it reads 'bring somebody in' means to ask somebody to take part in....'.

    Looking forward to hearing from you.

    Thank you in advance.

    Jiang

  1. MikeNewYork's Avatar
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    #2

    Re: in or along

    Quote Originally Posted by jiang View Post
    Dear teachers,

    Please read the following sentence:

    I think we should try to bring him ALONG. He is quite an expert on this subject.

    My question is: can I replace 'along' with 'in'? In my dictionary it reads 'bring somebody in' means to ask somebody to take part in....'.

    Looking forward to hearing from you.

    Thank you in advance.

    Jiang
    If that is your meaning "in" works better than "along". To bring someone along means to have him aacompany you somewhere.

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    #3

    Re: in or along


    Dear Mike,
    I didn't explain it clearly.
    This is an exercise in my textbook. The original sentence is like this:
    I think we should try to bring him ________. He is quite an expert on this subject.

    The key is along. In my dictionary written by Chinese it has a definition of 'bring in' which I translated as 'ask somebody to take part in'. I don't know whether the translation is precise or not. According to what you explained both 'along' and 'in' are correct but meaning is different. Is that right?

    Jiang
    Quote Originally Posted by MikeNewYork View Post
    If that is your meaning "in" works better than "along". To bring someone along means to have him aacompany you somewhere.

  2. MikeNewYork's Avatar
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    #4

    Re: in or along

    Quote Originally Posted by jiang View Post

    Dear Mike,
    I didn't explain it clearly.
    This is an exercise in my textbook. The original sentence is like this:
    I think we should try to bring him ________. He is quite an expert on this subject.

    The key is along. In my dictionary written by Chinese it has a definition of 'bring in' which I translated as 'ask somebody to take part in'. I don't know whether the translation is precise or not. According to what you explained both 'along' and 'in' are correct but meaning is different. Is that right?

    Jiang
    That is correct. They can both be correct.

    We are going to a meeting about the budget. I think we should try to bring John along.

    <People at a meeting>. Let's bring John in. He knows a lot....

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    #5

    Re: in or along


    Dear Mike,

    Thank you very much for your explanation. Now I see.

    Jiang
    Quote Originally Posted by MikeNewYork View Post
    That is correct. They can both be correct.

    We are going to a meeting about the budget. I think we should try to bring John along.

    <People at a meeting>. Let's bring John in. He knows a lot....

  3. MikeNewYork's Avatar
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    #6

    Re: in or along

    Quote Originally Posted by jiang View Post

    Dear Mike,

    Thank you very much for your explanation. Now I see.

    Jiang
    You're welcome.

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