Results 1 to 7 of 7

    • Join Date: Nov 2006
    • Posts: 27
    #1

    Twilight's last gleaming.

    Dear Teachers:

    I was reading the US National Anthem Star-Spangled Banner. It is interesting to understand the story behind the song. However my questions is about grammar. I understand that maybe it is old English and a poem. My question is about the using of "gleaming" I searched for it in Oxford's and says that it is and Adjetive and in the pharse it sound to me as a noun.

    Could you help me to solve my confusion?

    Best Regards.

    Hector.


    • Join Date: Nov 2006
    • Posts: 27
    #2

    Re: Twilight's last gleaming.

    Dear Teacher,

    Its me again, by the way there is another word "o'ver" that means over, why the letter e is replaced by the apostrophe? The same happens with thro' in Star Spangled Banner.

    Regards.

    Hector.

  1. BobK's Avatar
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • English
      • Home Country:
      • UK
      • Current Location:
      • UK

    • Join Date: Jul 2006
    • Posts: 16,038
    #3

    Re: Twilight's last gleaming.

    Quote Originally Posted by Albino View Post
    Dear Teachers:

    I was reading the US National Anthem Star-Spangled Banner. It is interesting to understand the story behind the song. However my questions is about grammar. I understand that maybe it is old English and a poem. My question is about the using of "gleaming" I searched for it in Oxford's and says that it is and Adjetive and in the pharse it sound to me as a noun.

    Could you help me to solve my confusion?

    Best Regards.

    Hector.
    Be careful with the expression 'Old English'; OE predates any European presence in America by several hundred years - the small 'o' lets you off the hook, but it was a close thing!

    I don't understand what you're saying about Oxford, but 'gleaming' there is a gerund - a verbal noun.

    b


    • Join Date: Nov 2006
    • Posts: 27
    #4

    Re: Twilight's last gleaming.

    BobK,

    It is true I should have use "Old English".

    Oxford Dictionary says:

    gleam

    • verb shine brightly, especially with reflected light.

    • noun 1 a faint or brief light. 2 a brief or faint show of a quality or emotion.

    — PHRASES a gleam in someone’s eye see EYE.

    — DERIVATIVES gleaming adjective.

    — ORIGIN Old English.

    If I were written the sentence, my sentence would be “Twilight's last gleam”

    But You are mantioning the concept of “verbal noun” isn’t it? It is new for me.

    So the gerund of the verb gleam i.e. 'gleaming' is a verbal noun meaning gleam.


    I hope to be clearer this time.

    Hector Albino.

  2. Ouisch's Avatar
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • English
      • Home Country:
      • United States
      • Current Location:
      • United States

    • Join Date: Mar 2006
    • Posts: 4,142
    #5

    Re: Twilight's last gleaming.

    "O'er" uses the apostrophe to replace the "v" in "over." This is simply to make the word fit into the melody. When sung, it sounds like "oar ramparts we watched" instead of "over ramparts we watched."

  3. BobK's Avatar
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • English
      • Home Country:
      • UK
      • Current Location:
      • UK

    • Join Date: Jul 2006
    • Posts: 16,038
    #6

    Re: Twilight's last gleaming.

    Quote Originally Posted by Albino View Post
    ...
    Oxford Dictionary says:
    ...
    — DERIVATIVES gleaming adjective.
    There is an adjectival form 'gleaming' (sometimes referred to as the 'present participle'), but another '-ing' form of the verb is the gerund - which behaves like a noun. I wouldn't say it means the same as the noun 'gleam'; it emphasizes the process of making a gleam - giving off light.

    b


    • Join Date: Nov 2006
    • Posts: 27
    #7

    Re: Twilight's last gleaming.

    Dear BobK and Ouisch:

    Thank your kind explanation. Both were very helpful to me. ESL gives the opportunity to many people not only to grow as professional but also as a human being. The forum is superb.

    Best Regards.

    Hector Albino.

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •