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    #1

    immune to and free from

    Dear teachers,

    I have some difficulty in distinguishing between 'immune to ' and 'free from'. For example, we can say 'He is immune from colds'. Could you please explain to me if I can say ' He is free from colds'?

    Looking forward to hearing from you.

    Thank you in advance.

    Jiang

  1. Ouisch's Avatar
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    #2

    Re: immune to and free from

    "Immune to" literally means that someone is protected from a disease due to innoculation. "The Salk vaccine made a generation of children immune to polio."

    It can also be used figuratively; for example, certain ambassadors and dignitaries have "diplomatic immunity," meaning they cannot be prosecuted for certain crimes.

    "Free from" is a temporary condition. Just because you were free from colds last year doesn't mean you won't catch one this year. "The dentist said I didn't need any fillings - I managed to stay free from tooth decay since my last visit."

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    #3

    Re: immune to and free from


    Dear Quisch,

    Thank you very much for your explanation. Now I see.

    Have a nice weekend.

    Jiang
    Quote Originally Posted by Ouisch View Post
    "Immune to" literally means that someone is protected from a disease due to innoculation. "The Salk vaccine made a generation of children immune to polio."

    It can also be used figuratively; for example, certain ambassadors and dignitaries have "diplomatic immunity," meaning they cannot be prosecuted for certain crimes.

    "Free from" is a temporary condition. Just because you were free from colds last year doesn't mean you won't catch one this year. "The dentist said I didn't need any fillings - I managed to stay free from tooth decay since my last visit."

  2. BobK's Avatar
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    #4

    Re: immune to and free from

    Quote Originally Posted by Ouisch View Post
    "Immune to" ...
    can also be used figuratively; for example, certain ambassadors and dignitaries have "diplomatic immunity," meaning they cannot be prosecuted for certain crimes.
    There are many figurative uses, jiang - not just in cases of prosecution. I could say: 'Don't offer me money - I'm immune to bribery' or 'Don't bother saying how helpful I am - I'm immune to flattery.' (Of course, I'm not. )

    b

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    #5

    Re: immune to and free from

    Quote Originally Posted by jiang View Post

    Dear Quisch,

    Thank you very much for your explanation. Now I see.

    Have a nice weekend.

    Jiang
    I just want to add that "immunity" can occur from having had an illness as well as from being innoculated against it.

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    #6

    Re: immune to and free from


    Dear BobK,

    Thank you very much for your explanation. Now I see.

    Have a nice weekend.

    Jiang
    Quote Originally Posted by BobK View Post
    There are many figurative uses, jiang - not just in cases of prosecution. I could say: 'Don't offer me money - I'm immune to bribery' or 'Don't bother saying how helpful I am - I'm immune to flattery.' (Of course, I'm not. )

    b

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    #7

    Re: immune to and free from


    Dear Mike,

    Thank you very much for your further explanation. In my dictionary it reads:
    the fact of not being affected by adisease or harmed by something unpleasant.

    But the first meaning of your explanation is different from that in my dictionay. Could you please kindly further explain it?

    Looking forward to hearing from you.

    Thank you in advance.

    Jiang


    Quote Originally Posted by MikeNewYork View Post
    I just want to add that "immunity" can occur from having had an illness as well as from being innoculated against it.

  4. MikeNewYork's Avatar
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    #8

    Re: immune to and free from

    Quote Originally Posted by jiang View Post

    Dear Mike,

    Thank you very much for your further explanation. In my dictionary it reads:
    the fact of not being affected by adisease or harmed by something unpleasant.

    But the first meaning of your explanation is different from that in my dictionay. Could you please kindly further explain it?

    Looking forward to hearing from you.

    Thank you in advance.

    Jiang
    There are three main ways to acquire immunity to an infectious disease:

    1. borrow immunity from one's mother (passive immunity of newborns)
    2. develop immunity after having a disease
    3. develp immunity after a vaccination (simulates having the disease)

    Your dictionary means that once one is immune, one cannot be infected. One way to develop that immunity to have a disease and recover from it. Then you can't get it again (at least for a while).

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    #9

    Re: immune to and free from


    Dear Mike,

    Thank you very much for your explanation. Now I see.

    Have a nice weekend.

    Jiang
    Quote Originally Posted by MikeNewYork View Post
    There are three main ways to acquire immunity to an infectious disease:

    1. borrow immunity from one's mother (passive immunity of newborns)
    2. develop immunity after having a disease
    3. develp immunity after a vaccination (simulates having the disease)

    Your dictionary means that once one is immune, one cannot be infected. One way to develop that immunity to have a disease and recover from it. Then you can't get it again (at least for a while).

  5. MikeNewYork's Avatar
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    #10

    Re: immune to and free from

    Quote Originally Posted by jiang View Post

    Dear Mike,

    Thank you very much for your explanation. Now I see.

    Have a nice weekend.

    Jiang
    You're welcome.

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