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  1. #1

    Question for, while, etc.

    Good morning to everybody!

    I have 4 separate questions.

    1) In the sentence "I found the book I had been looking for for a long time",
    is it correct to repeat 'for' like this? If the answer is yes, and if I want to avoid using the same word twice like this, what other expressions I can use? I have been thinking in vain....

    2) In English, we are supposed to have a noun in statements. (I am sure there are exceptions...) How about the sentence like below.

    "While I was waiting for my friend to come, my beeper went off"

    Can I say, "While waiting for my friend to come.... "

    If yes, are there any other exceptions like this?

    3) The past perfect is used when we want ot talk about something happened some time in the past and finished. Please look at the sentence below.

    "If I had studied English harder in high school, I would have been able to do better".

    This person regret not having studied hard enough in his/her high school. However, it is still affecting the person and I'm sure it will be in the future. Do I still need to use the conditional of the past?

    4) The reported speech always gives me a headache.

    She said, " I am studying French"
    Let's say she said it last week. She is still studying French.

    Please look at the next 2 sentences.

    - She said she was studying French.
    - She said she is studying French.

    Gramatically, I think the first one is correct because the tense of the verb should agree. However, since she is still studying French right now, everybody I asked says the second one is the correct form.

    Please help me out here.

    I thank you in advance.

    Sincerely,
    erihime

  2. MikeNewYork's Avatar
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      • American English
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      • United States
      • Current Location:
      • United States

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    #2

    Re: for, while, etc.

    Quote Originally Posted by erihime View Post
    Good morning to everybody!

    I have 4 separate questions.

    1) In the sentence "I found the book I had been looking for for a long time",
    is it correct to repeat 'for' like this? If the answer is yes, and if I want to avoid using the same word twice like this, what other expressions I can use? I have been thinking in vain....

    2) In English, we are supposed to have a noun in statements. (I am sure there are exceptions...) How about the sentence like below.

    "While I was waiting for my friend to come, my beeper went off"

    Can I say, "While waiting for my friend to come.... "

    If yes, are there any other exceptions like this?

    3) The past perfect is used when we want ot talk about something happened some time in the past and finished. Please look at the sentence below.

    "If I had studied English harder in high school, I would have been able to do better".

    This person regret not having studied hard enough in his/her high school. However, it is still affecting the person and I'm sure it will be in the future. Do I still need to use the conditional of the past?

    4) The reported speech always gives me a headache.

    She said, " I am studying French"
    Let's say she said it last week. She is still studying French.

    Please look at the next 2 sentences.

    - She said she was studying French.
    - She said she is studying French.

    Gramatically, I think the first one is correct because the tense of the verb should agree. However, since she is still studying French right now, everybody I asked says the second one is the correct form.

    Please help me out here.

    I thank you in advance.

    Sincerely,
    erihime
    1. It is not incorrect to use the same word twice in succession if it is called for. However, it cam look like an error. It would be better to choose a synonym for "looking for". I would recommend "seeking".

    2. If you reduce the opening phrase to "while waiting for..." the phrase appears to modify "beeper", but the beeper was not waiting for your friend.

    3. In this case, the "past perfect" is used in the "if" clause of a third conditional. It backs up one tense because the result clause is in the past conditional. This is a very common use of the past perfect.

    4. They are both correct. We normally use the past tense for reported speech, but we can use the present tense if we know the situation hasn't changed.

  3. #3

    Question Re: for, while, etc.

    Good morning, Mike.
    Thanks for your help!.
    By the way, did you have a good Thanksgiving?

    You clarified 3 out 4 questions. I feel much better.

    I not still sure of the past conditional.

    'If I had not passed the exam, I would not have had enjoyed the last summer'

    I understand the sentence above. Since both 'exam' and 'the last summer' happened in the past.

    Then, the fact happened in the past is affecting the present, we can still say

    'If I had studied harder in high school, I would not have had to struggle now.' ? Is this correct? Or are there better ways to express the same meaning?

    I will be waiting on this side of my pc.
    Thanks, Mike!

    Have a nice day!
    It is beautiful out here.

  4. MikeNewYork's Avatar
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      • American English
      • Home Country:
      • United States
      • Current Location:
      • United States

    • Join Date: Nov 2002
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    #4

    Re: for, while, etc.

    Quote Originally Posted by erihime View Post
    Good morning, Mike.
    Thanks for your help!.
    By the way, did you have a good Thanksgiving?

    You clarified 3 out 4 questions. I feel much better.

    I not still sure of the past conditional.

    'If I had not passed the exam, I would not have had enjoyed the last summer'

    I understand the sentence above. Since both 'exam' and 'the last summer' happened in the past.

    Then, the fact happened in the past is affecting the present, we can still say

    'If I had studied harder in high school, I would not have had to struggle now.' ? Is this correct? Or are there better ways to express the same meaning?

    I will be waiting on this side of my pc.
    Thanks, Mike!

    Have a nice day!
    It is beautiful out here.
    Yours is not correct. I would not have had to struglle is not in the present time. If you want it in the present, use the present conditional.

    If I studied harder in high school, I would not have to struggle now.
    That is a second conditional. It is also OK as a mixed conditional.

    If I had studied harder in high school, I would not have to struggle now.

  5. #5

    Talking Re: for, while, etc.

    Hello, Mike. You are wonderful.

    This question has been bothering me so long. Nobody took time to explain these conditionals in details. They drew time lines and gave us some examples, but not in varieties. I didn't know it's o.k. to write the mixed conditional.

    "If I had studied harder in high school, I would not have to struggle now."

    It is an eye opener.

    Now, I feel like I can enjoy the holiday season.

    Happy holidays!

    Thanks again!

    erihime.

  6. MikeNewYork's Avatar
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      • Native Language:
      • American English
      • Home Country:
      • United States
      • Current Location:
      • United States

    • Join Date: Nov 2002
    • Posts: 24,983
    #6

    Re: for, while, etc.

    Quote Originally Posted by erihime View Post
    Hello, Mike. You are wonderful.

    This question has been bothering me so long. Nobody took time to explain these conditionals in details. They drew time lines and gave us some examples, but not in varieties. I didn't know it's o.k. to write the mixed conditional.

    "If I had studied harder in high school, I would not have to struggle now."

    It is an eye opener.

    Now, I feel like I can enjoy the holiday season.

    Happy holidays!

    Thanks again!

    erihime.
    Wow! That was a powerful thank you. You are most welcome.

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