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  1. #1

    Cool concubine

    Hi,

    What's the masculine of concubine?

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    #2

    Re: concubine

    Hello Ieasy

    I'm not sure there is an exact equivalent. "Cicisbeo" is close; but it only relates to a particular historical period.

    In what context did you want to use it?

    MrP

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    #3

    Re: concubine

    It depends exactly what you mean.

    If you mean a woman who sleeps with a man who is not married to her -- a mistress, in other words -- the male equivalent might be "lover".

    But if you mean a secondary wife or a low-ranking member of a harem, I don't think there is a male equivalent. As far as I know, societies where one woman can (legally) have more than one husband are very rare. I would probably write "lower-ranking husband" or "additional husband" if necessary, otherwise just "husband".

  3. curmudgeon's Avatar
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    #4

    Re: concubine

    In ancient Rome , a concubinus was a young male slave who was chosen to be the homosexual partner of a nobleman. They didn't just invent central heating.


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    #5

    Re: concubine

    Other than jokingly, it seems to me that 'concubine' is also tied to a certain historical period and even some cultures.

    A similar term is 'gigolo'. This term is, I believe, in more current use.

  4. #6

    Re: concubine

    Hey, and what about cohabitant? or cohabitee? Could the words be the masculines of concubine?


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    #7

    Re: concubine

    Quote Originally Posted by ieasy View Post
    Hey, and what about cohabitant? or cohabitee? Could the words be the masculines of concubine?
    These two words describe a more equal living relationship, Ieasy while concubine and gigolo describe an unequal sexual relationship.


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    #8

    Re: concubine

    'Concubine' is derived from 'concupiscence' which means sexual desire.

    Both terms are very old but they're still used in some languages derived from latin. (concubine, concubinage in French / concubina ,concubinaggio in Italian) however I do not think I've heard the term in spoken English before.

    I'd use lover (both male and female) and mistress (female) if it was an extramarital affair.

    Verb to cohabit means that two people who are not married, cohabit, they live together and have a sexual relationship. It's a formal term anyway.

    However, a cohabitant/ cohabitee is a formal term for someone who lives in the same house, apartment, etc. as someone else, it doesn't necessarily involve a sexual relationship.

    I think 'lover' will do

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    #9

    Re: concubine

    Look, I am not a teacher, but I speak French. And there "concubine" and "concubin" (male) live in "concubinage" - an official status registered by city administration.

  6. #10

    Re: concubine

    Yes, it's strange when some words are obvious in a language like for example concubin in French which is the masculine of concubine (= concubine). And in English it does not seem to have a fully similar translation. Because I believe that the word lover, is masculine and feminine and gigolo is a quite pejorative word while concubine is not.

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