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    #1

    except and except for etc.

    Dear teachers,

    I have three questions to ask:

    No.1
    We have covered all the issues except one. My question is: Can I use 'except for one' instead of 'except one'?

    No.2
    The police stood on the side of the demonstrators.
    I know I can say ' to be behind sb' which means 'in a role of suporting'. Could you please tell me if 'to stand behind sb' bear the same meaning with ' to be behind'. The only thing I see improper is that all the examples are 'to be behind'. But if I use 'stand' as a link verb does it work?

    No.3
    We were origianlly ordered to ________the enemylines before sundown.
    a. break through b. slip through
    The key is 'a'. No problem and 'to break through the enemylines' seems to be a set collocation. My question is: Can I choose 'b' which means to 'pass through the enemylines quietly'?

    Looking forward to hearing from you.
    Thankk you in advance.

    Jiang

  1. MikeNewYork's Avatar
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    #2

    Re: except and except for etc.

    Quote Originally Posted by jiang View Post
    Dear teachers,

    I have three questions to ask:

    No.1
    We have covered all the issues except one. My question is: Can I use 'except for one' instead of 'except one'?

    No.2
    The police stood on the side of the demonstrators.
    I know I can say ' to be behind sb' which means 'in a role of suporting'. Could you please tell me if 'to stand behind sb' bear the same meaning with ' to be behind'. The only thing I see improper is that all the examples are 'to be behind'. But if I use 'stand' as a link verb does it work?

    No.3
    We were origianlly ordered to ________the enemylines before sundown.
    a. break through b. slip through
    The key is 'a'. No problem and 'to break through the enemylines' seems to be a set collocation. My question is: Can I choose 'b' which means to 'pass through the enemylines quietly'?

    Looking forward to hearing from you.
    Thankk you in advance.

    Jiang
    1. Yes.

    2. Yes, "to be behind" and "to stand behind" can both mean to support. However, all three expressions, including "stood on the side" can refer to physical position. That meakes the meaning unclear. If you want to indicate that the police supported the demonstrators, use "supportrd".

    3. Once again, both are correct.

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    #3

    Re: except and except for etc.


    Dear Mike,

    Thank you very much for your explanation. Now I understand all of them.
    No.2 is a multiple choice exercise. It is like this:

    The police stood ________ the demonstrators.
    a. on the side of b. behind
    The key is 'a'. And I was wondering if 'b' is also correct. That's why I asked if 'b' is correct. Now I see both are correct and the better word in this sentence should be 'supported'.

    Have a nice weekend.

    Jiang
    Quote Originally Posted by MikeNewYork View Post
    1. Yes.

    2. Yes, "to be behind" and "to stand behind" can both mean to support. However, all three expressions, including "stood on the side" can refer to physical position. That meakes the meaning unclear. If you want to indicate that the police supported the demonstrators, use "supportrd".

    3. Once again, both are correct.

  2. RonBee's Avatar
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    #4

    Re: except and except for etc.

    You could say that the police stood behind the demonstrators or that they stood to the side of the demonstrators.

    (Slipped behind enemy lines is probably more usual.)

    ~R


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    #5

    Re: except and except for etc.

    Hi, Jiang,
    Here's some additional info.

    1. Except and except for are interchangeable if they follow all, whole, any-(-thing, -body etc)..., every-..., no.-..
    She cleaned all the house except/except for the kitchen.

    2. Only except can be followed by prepositions or conjunctions.
    It's the same everywhere except in Kabul.
    Jimmy is a nice kid except when he's at school.

    3. Only except for can stand at the beginning.
    Except for some typos your essay is good.

    Regards

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    #6

    Re: except and except for etc.


    Dear RonBee,
    Thank you very much for your explanation. Now I see.

    Have a nice weekend.
    Jiang
    Quote Originally Posted by RonBee View Post
    You could say that the police stood behind the demonstrators or that they stood to the side of the demonstrators.

    (Slipped behind enemy lines is probably more usual.)

    ~R

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    #7

    Re: except and except for etc.


    Dear Humble,

    Thank you very much for your information. Now I see.

    Have a nice weekend.

    Jiang
    Quote Originally Posted by Humble View Post
    Hi, Jiang,
    Here's some additional info.

    1. Except and except for are interchangeable if they follow all, whole, any-(-thing, -body etc)..., every-..., no.-..
    She cleaned all the house except/except for the kitchen.

    2. Only except can be followed by prepositions or conjunctions.
    It's the same everywhere except in Kabul.
    Jimmy is a nice kid except when he's at school.

    3. Only except for can stand at the beginning.
    Except for some typos your essay is good.

    Regards

  3. MikeNewYork's Avatar
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    #8

    Re: except and except for etc.

    Quote Originally Posted by jiang View Post

    Dear Mike,

    Thank you very much for your explanation. Now I understand all of them.
    No.2 is a multiple choice exercise. It is like this:

    The police stood ________ the demonstrators.
    a. on the side of b. behind
    The key is 'a'. And I was wondering if 'b' is also correct. That's why I asked if 'b' is correct. Now I see both are correct and the better word in this sentence should be 'supported'.

    Have a nice weekend.

    Jiang
    Yes B is correct. "Supported" is better if that is the intended meaning.

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    #9

    Re: except and except for etc.


    Dear Mike,
    Thank you very much for your explanation. Now I see both 'a' and 'b' are correct.

    Jiang
    Quote Originally Posted by MikeNewYork View Post
    Yes B is correct. "Supported" is better if that is the intended meaning.

  4. MikeNewYork's Avatar
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    #10

    Re: except and except for etc.

    Quote Originally Posted by jiang View Post
    Dear Mike,
    Thank you very much for your explanation. Now I see both 'a' and 'b' are correct.

    Jiang
    You're welcome.

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