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    • Join Date: Nov 2006
    • Posts: 27
    #1

    "For I have sworn before you"

    Dear Teachers:

    Yesterday I was listening to the recording of the John F. Kennedy inaugural speech. There you can listen to the famous passage: “it is not what your country can do for you, but what you can do for your country” . But my question is about the structure and the usage of the word “for” when he says "For I have sworn before you and Almighty God". I understand that it is very formal, but how is the pattern or the rule for use it in this way.

    I hope to be clear with my doubt.

    Best wishes.

    Hector.


    • Join Date: Jul 2006
    • Posts: 2,886
    #2

    Re: "For I have sworn before you"

    for = because

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