Results 1 to 10 of 10
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • Chinese
      • Home Country:
      • China
      • Current Location:
      • China

    • Join Date: Nov 2003
    • Posts: 2,715
    #1

    preside at etc.

    Dear teachers,
    I came across some exercises which are very difficult.
    No.1
    It is customary for the president to preside _________ this meeting, and when he enters, everybody will rise out of respect.
    a. at b. over
    The key is 'b'. However, I found the following sentences in my dictionary:
    a. The vice president will preside at today's meeting.
    b. He presided over some of the most far-reaching reforms his country has ever seen.
    c. Judge Langdale is to preside over the official enquiry into the case.

    It seems 'a' should be the correct answer. Is that right?

    No.2
    He was weak and unsteady _________( for, with, from) age, but there was still something of a monkey ________ ( in, with, about) him.
    The answers are 'with' and 'in, about'.
    Here with means 'owing to'. Is that right? And does the latter part of the sentence means 'He is like a young person in character'? I can't find the expression in my dictionaries. And what does this 'in' mean?

    No.3
    Don't leave anything on the stove when you have something on your mind.
    I can't find 'leave anything on the stove ' in my dictionary. Does it mean 'tell what you have on your mind to others'?

    No.4
    In my day we thought ________ money as soemthing dirty.
    a. of b. about
    Both 'a' and 'b' can mean 'consider'. But the key is 'a'. Could you please kindly explain why?

    Looking forward to hearing from you.

    Thank you in advance.

    Jiang

  1. BobK's Avatar
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • English
      • Home Country:
      • UK
      • Current Location:
      • UK

    • Join Date: Jul 2006
    • Posts: 16,038
    #2

    Re: preside at etc.

    Quote Originally Posted by jiang View Post
    Dear teachers,
    I came across some exercises which are very difficult.
    No.1
    It is customary for the president to preside _________ this meeting, and when he enters, everybody will rise out of respect.
    a. at b. over
    The key is 'b'. However, I found the following sentences in my dictionary:
    a. The vice president will preside at today's meeting.
    b. He presided over some of the most far-reaching reforms his country has ever seen.
    c. Judge Langdale is to preside over the official enquiry into the case.

    It seems 'a' should be the correct answer. Is that right?
    I wouldn't agree that 'a' is the correct answer, but it's a correct answer.

    Quote Originally Posted by jiang View Post
    No.2
    He was weak and unsteady _________( for, with, from) age, but there was still something of a monkey ________ ( in, with, about) him.
    The answers are 'with' and 'in, about'.
    Here with means 'owing to'. Is that right? And does the latter part of the sentence mean_ [no s]'He is like a young person in character'? I can't find the expression in my dictionaries. And what does this 'in' mean?
    Parents often call a mischievous child 'a little monkey', and there is an expression for someone who's playful: 'cheeky monkey'. But I think your sentence is just referring to suppleness, wide-awakeness, and agility.
    Quote Originally Posted by jiang View Post
    No.3
    Don't leave anything on the stove when you have something on your mind.
    I can't find 'leave anything on the stove ' in my dictionary. Does it mean 'tell what you have on your mind to others'?
    There's no metaphor here: when you 'leave sth on the stove' you leave a saucepan on the cooker (and it boils dry/sticks/burns). (On second thoughts, maybe this is a metaphor - but if so, it's a new one on me; 'leaving sth on the stove' might mean leaving something in a potentially dangerous unfinished state while you turn your attention to something else.)

    Quote Originally Posted by jiang View Post
    No.4
    In my day we thought ________ money as soemthing dirty.
    a. of b. about
    Both 'a' and 'b' can mean 'consider'. But the key is 'a'. Could you please kindly explain why?

    ...
    Think of = view, consider
    Think about = reflect on, pay individual attention to, consider [as you said]

    I'd accept either, but I think in your example I'd choose 'a'.

    b
    Last edited by BobK; 08-Dec-2006 at 15:24. Reason: Fix typos

  2. MikeNewYork's Avatar
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • American English
      • Home Country:
      • United States
      • Current Location:
      • United States

    • Join Date: Nov 2002
    • Posts: 24,983
    #3

    Re: preside at etc.

    Quote Originally Posted by jiang View Post
    Dear teachers,
    I came across some exercises which are very difficult.
    No.1
    It is customary for the president to preside _________ this meeting, and when he enters, everybody will rise out of respect.
    a. at b. over
    The key is 'b'. However, I found the following sentences in my dictionary:
    a. The vice president will preside at today's meeting.
    b. He presided over some of the most far-reaching reforms his country has ever seen.
    c. Judge Langdale is to preside over the official enquiry into the case.

    It seems 'a' should be the correct answer. Is that right?

    No.2
    He was weak and unsteady _________( for, with, from) age, but there was still something of a monkey ________ ( in, with, about) him.
    The answers are 'with' and 'in, about'.
    Here with means 'owing to'. Is that right? And does the latter part of the sentence means 'He is like a young person in character'? I can't find the expression in my dictionaries. And what does this 'in' mean?

    No.3
    Don't leave anything on the stove when you have something on your mind.
    I can't find 'leave anything on the stove ' in my dictionary. Does it mean 'tell what you have on your mind to others'?

    No.4
    In my day we thought ________ money as soemthing dirty.
    a. of b. about
    Both 'a' and 'b' can mean 'consider'. But the key is 'a'. Could you please kindly explain why?

    Looking forward to hearing from you.

    Thank you in advance.

    Jiang
    I agree with all of Bob's answers. I just want to add another correct answer for #2. One can be weak and unsteady "from" age also.

    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • Chinese
      • Home Country:
      • China
      • Current Location:
      • China

    • Join Date: Nov 2003
    • Posts: 2,715
    #4

    Re: preside at etc.

    &
    Dear Bob,
    Thank you very much for your explanation. I think I understand all the explanation to them. But I am not sure of your conclusions. So I have to ask more questions:

    No.1
    Could you please tell me bying saying " I wouldn't agree that 'a' is the correct answer, but it's a correct answer' do you mean I should use 'a correct answer' instead of 'the correct answer'?
    No.2
    He was weak and unsteady _________( for, with, from) age, but there was still something of a monkey ________ ( in, with, about) him.
    The answers are 'with' and 'in, about'.
    Could you please explain what this 'in' means and why can't I use 'with' ?
    No.3
    Could you please tell me if you think both 'think of' and 'think about' would work in this sentence but 'think of' is better or you think 'think of ' is the only correct answer?
    No.4
    This is the additional information:
    Don't leave anything on the stove when you have something on your mind. Your are quite capable of forgetting all about it.

    Looking forward to hearing from you.
    Thank you in advance.
    Have a nice weekend.
    Jiang
    Quote Originally Posted by BobK View Post
    I wouldn't agree that 'a' is the correct answer, but it's a correct answer.


    Parents often call a mischievous child 'a little monkey', and there is an expression for someone who's playful: 'cheeky monkey'. But I think your sentence is just referring to suppleness, wide-awakeness, and agility.

    There's no metaphor here: when you 'leave sth on the stove' you leave a saucepan on the cooker (and it boils dry/sticks/burns). (On second thoughts, maybe this is a metaphor - but if so, it's a new one on me; 'leaving sth on the stove' might mean leaving something in a potentially dangerous unfinished state while you turn your attention to something else.)


    Think of = view, consider
    Think about = reflect on, pay individual attention to, consider [as you said]

    I'd accept either, but I think in your example I'd choose 'a'.

    b
    Last edited by jiang; 09-Dec-2006 at 01:39.

    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • Chinese
      • Home Country:
      • China
      • Current Location:
      • China

    • Join Date: Nov 2003
    • Posts: 2,715
    #5

    Re: preside at etc.


    Dear Mike,
    Thank you very much for your additional information. Now I see. Prepositions are too difficult.

    Have a nice weekend.

    Jiang
    Quote Originally Posted by MikeNewYork View Post
    I agree with all of Bob's answers. I just want to add another correct answer for #2. One can be weak and unsteady "from" age also.

  3. Webmaster, UsingEnglish.com
    Interested in Language
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • British English
      • Home Country:
      • England
      • Current Location:
      • England

    • Join Date: Nov 2002
    • Posts: 3,567
    #6

    Re: preside at etc.

    Prepositions might be difficult, but they are not too difficult. Have patience and it will come.
    I'm not a teacher, so please consider any advice I give in that context.

    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • Chinese
      • Home Country:
      • China
      • Current Location:
      • China

    • Join Date: Nov 2003
    • Posts: 2,715
    #7

    Re: preside at etc.


    Dear Red5,
    Thank you very much for comforting me. They really confuse me. In the 'preside at or over' case. I had come across two example of 'preside over a meeting'. In this case it seems both are correct. This is too bad.

    Have a nice weekend.
    Jiang
    Quote Originally Posted by Red5 View Post
    Prepositions might be difficult, but they are not too difficult. Have patience and it will come.

  4. MikeNewYork's Avatar
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • American English
      • Home Country:
      • United States
      • Current Location:
      • United States

    • Join Date: Nov 2002
    • Posts: 24,983
    #8

    Re: preside at etc.

    Quote Originally Posted by jiang View Post

    Dear Mike,
    Thank you very much for your additional information. Now I see. Prepositions are too difficult.

    Have a nice weekend.

    Jiang
    You're welcome. They are tough, but they come with practice.

  5. BobK's Avatar
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • English
      • Home Country:
      • UK
      • Current Location:
      • UK

    • Join Date: Jul 2006
    • Posts: 16,038
    #9

    Re: preside at etc.

    Quote Originally Posted by jiang View Post
    &
    Dear Bob,
    Thank you very much for your explanation. I think I understand all the explanation to them. But I am not sure of your conclusions. So I have to ask more questions:

    No.1
    Could you please tell me bying saying " I wouldn't agree that 'a' is the correct answer, but it's a correct answer' do you mean I should use 'a correct answer' instead of 'the correct answer'?
    No jiang - it wasn't a comment on your usage. I just meant both expressions were possible.
    Quote Originally Posted by jiang View Post
    No.2
    He was weak and unsteady _________( for, with, from) age, but there was still something of a monkey ________ ( in, with, about) him.
    The answers are 'with' and 'in, about'.
    Could you please explain what this 'in' means and why can't I use 'with' ?
    You are talking about characteristics - 'with' only works if you're talking about specific characteristics - the man with the red nose, What's wrong with you?. The words 'in' and 'about' refer to general characteristics, I think - though I agree that prepositions aren't easy (at all! - I've just thought of a counter-example to my own observation: the girl in the red dress = the girl with a red dress on.) I need help - sorry jiang ( very good question )

    Quote Originally Posted by jiang View Post
    No.3
    Could you please tell me if you think both 'think of' and 'think about' would work in this sentence but 'think of' is better or you think 'think of ' is the only correct answer?
    'Think about' wouldn't work here - 'think of' in this case means 'regard'; 'think about' suggests a more intense/reflective view.

    Quote Originally Posted by jiang View Post
    No.4
    This is the additional information:
    Don't leave anything on the stove when you have something on your mind. Your are quite capable of forgetting all about it.
    That extra context doesn't really make it clear whether the writer is using the expression figuratively. In a context that dealt with household management, I'd say it wasn't figurative. But some new-age popular psychologists might well use it figuratively (to refer to having confused priorities) - I haven't met it though.

    Quote Originally Posted by jiang View Post
    No.4

    Looking forward to hearing from you.
    Thank you in advance.
    Have a nice weekend.
    Jiang
    Better late than never, jiang - . Have a good week.

    b

    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • Chinese
      • Home Country:
      • China
      • Current Location:
      • China

    • Join Date: Nov 2003
    • Posts: 2,715
    #10

    Re: preside at etc.


    Dear BobK,

    Thank you very much for your explanation. Now I see except some preposition.

    Have a good week, too.

    Jiang
    Quote Originally Posted by BobK View Post
    No jiang - it wasn't a comment on your usage. I just meant both expressions were possible.

    You are talking about characteristics - 'with' only works if you're talking about specific characteristics - the man with the red nose, What's wrong with you?. The words 'in' and 'about' refer to general characteristics, I think - though I agree that prepositions aren't easy (at all! - I've just thought of a counter-example to my own observation: the girl in the red dress = the girl with a red dress on.) I need help - sorry jiang ( very good question )


    'Think about' wouldn't work here - 'think of' in this case means 'regard'; 'think about' suggests a more intense/reflective view.



    That extra context doesn't really make it clear whether the writer is using the expression figuratively. In a context that dealt with household management, I'd say it wasn't figurative. But some new-age popular psychologists might well use it figuratively (to refer to having confused priorities) - I haven't met it though.



    Better late than never, jiang - . Have a good week.

    b

Similar Threads

  1. comprehension
    By Joe in forum Ask a Teacher
    Replies: 3
    Last Post: 27-Aug-2004, 04:18

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •