Results 1 to 4 of 4
  1. Unregistered
    Guest
    #1

    "A withered tree blossoms again"

    "A withered tree blossoms again" is the literal translation from a Chinese idiom. The original Chinese idiom symblozies that some dead thing comes to life or sth. unusual happens. I wonder whether the English translation has the same symbolic meaning in English native speakers' mind as that in a native Chinese speaker's mind. If it doesn't have the symbolic meaning, then what idiomatic expression can be used to convey the meaning of "some dead thing comes/ will come to life or sth. unusual happens/ will happen" ?

    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • British English
      • Home Country:
      • UK
      • Current Location:
      • Laos

    • Join Date: Nov 2002
    • Posts: 57,910
    #2

    Re: "A withered tree blossoms again"

    We say that something will rise like a phoenix from the ashes. The phoenix was a mythical bird that burnt itself to death and was reborn from the ashes.

  2. #3

    Re: "A withered tree blossoms again"

    If the translated version is "A withered tree blossomed again", can native English speakers understand? and what might be the response when native English speakers read that sentence?

    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • British English
      • Home Country:
      • UK
      • Current Location:
      • Laos

    • Join Date: Nov 2002
    • Posts: 57,910
    #4

    Re: "A withered tree blossoms again"

    I had no trouble understanding it.

Similar Threads

  1. the term for 'fir tree'
    By Veronikap in forum Ask a Teacher
    Replies: 5
    Last Post: 21-Nov-2005, 11:37

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •