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    • Join Date: Jan 2006
    • Posts: 115
    #1

    Why gramatically false?

    (A) I am told that the following sentences are grammatically false.
    But I can't understand which part is false. Could teachers amend
    that?
    1.You will see many deers in Nara Park.
    2.You don't have to return this books until you will come to see me
    next time.
    (B) On the contrary, I heard that the following senrence is grammatically
    true. But I can't understand why. It doesn't seem complete. Would
    anyone tell me ?
    "This garden of his is beautiful."
    Thank you.

  1. MikeNewYork's Avatar
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      • American English
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      • United States
      • Current Location:
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    #2

    Re: Why gramatically false?

    Quote Originally Posted by YOSHITAKEHORI View Post
    (A) I am told that the following sentences are grammatically false.
    But I can't understand which part is false. Could teachers amend
    that?
    1.You will see many deers in Nara Park.
    2.You don't have to return this books until you will come to see me
    next time.
    (B) On the contrary, I heard that the following senrence is grammatically
    true. But I can't understand why. It doesn't seem complete. Would
    anyone tell me ?
    "This garden of his is beautiful."
    Thank you.
    That should be grammatically "incorrect" or "correct", not "false" or "true".

    1. Normally, the plural of "deer" is deer", but the plural "deers" does exist.
    I would use "deer" there.

    2. You don't have to return the books until you (come to) see me next time. The words in parentheses can be omitted unless there is a reason for them to be there.

    3. The third sentence is fine. This is sometimes called the double genitive, but it is correct in English. One could also say "His garden is beautiful."

    The American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language: Fourth Edition. 2000. double genitive NOUN:A phrasal construction in English in which possession is indicated by the word of followed by the possessive form of a noun or pronoun, as in a relative of mine or a friend of Pat's. Also called double possessive. See Usage Note at of.


    • Join Date: Jan 2006
    • Posts: 115
    #3

    Re: Why gramatically false?

    Quote Originally Posted by MikeNewYork View Post
    That should be grammatically "incorrect" or "correct", not "false" or "true".
    1. Normally, the plural of "deer" is deer", but the plural "deers" does exist.
    I would use "deer" there.
    2. You don't have to return the books until you (come to) see me next time. The words in parentheses can be omitted unless there is a reason for them to be there.
    3. The third sentence is fine. This is sometimes called the double genitive, but it is correct in English. One could also say "His garden is beautiful."
    The American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language: Fourth Edition. 2000. double genitive NOUN:A phrasal construction in English in which possession is indicated by the word of followed by the possessive form of a noun or pronoun, as in a relative of mine or a friend of Pat's. Also called double possessive. See Usage Note at of.
    MikeNewYork
    Thank you for your advice and explanation.
    But I am still confused at sentence No.2.
    Can this sentence use "future tense"? , namely
    You don't have to return this books until you will see me next time.
    Tks

  2. MikeNewYork's Avatar
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      • Native Language:
      • American English
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      • United States
      • Current Location:
      • United States

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    #4

    Re: Why gramatically false?

    Quote Originally Posted by YOSHITAKEHORI View Post
    MikeNewYork
    Thank you for your advice and explanation.
    But I am still confused at sentence No.2.
    Can this sentence use "future tense"? , namely
    You don't have to return this books until you will see me next time.
    Tks
    No, that needs the present tense. The word "until" already bridges us to the future.

  3. rewboss's Avatar

    • Join Date: Feb 2006
    • Posts: 1,552
    #5

    Re: Why gramatically false?

    Part of the problem is that English doesn't have a true future tense.

    "Will" can be used to refer to a future event when:

    1. it indicates that a decision has just been made: "It's getting dark -- I'll turn on the light."
    2. you are making a prediction: "Germany will win the next World Cup."

    But this "will-future" is not used when talking about conditions that must be met. It's not a prediction, and it's most definitely not a decision.

    "If it's sunny, we will have a picnic."

    In this sentence, I predict a picnic -- but only if the sun shines. The sunny weather is a condition, not a prediction.

    "...until you see me next time" is also not a prediction; again, it's a condition -- but we've introduced it with "until", not "if" or "when".


    • Join Date: Jan 2006
    • Posts: 115
    #6

    Re: Why gramatically false?

    MikeNewYork
    rewboss
    Thank you very much. Especially rewboss's explanation made
    me understand completely.

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